A Journey to Manitoulin Island – notes on a voyage of reconciliation

by Maggie Panter

Coral Petzoldt and I set out on a bright Saturday morning for a trip to Manitoulin Island to Connect to the Land, a tour organized by some folks from Church of the Redeemer and Trinity St. Paul’s.

There were nine of us, three folks tented, one stayed in Little Currant, and the rest were housed in cottages overlooking the water.

We attended a church service in Kagawong, St. John the Evangelist, the mariners’ church. Fr. Aiden has five children that he is responsible for! We spoke to the head of the Historical Society in Kagawin and visited the Old Mill Heritage Centre after walking along the Bridal Veil Falls.

We visited at the Wikwemikang (Wiki) reserve. It’s the only unceded land – and are the only band to have the treaty – a judge’s ruling to prove it.

On the Whitefish River Reserve we were permitted to climb Dreamers’ Rock accompanied by a guide, a sacred site.

We toured the Debajehmujig (Storyteller’s) Theatre headquarters, including the Art Gallery and animation studio.

We saw a beautiful Roman Catholic church in M’Chigeeng. It incorporated many Indigenous symbols and artwork. We participated in a Medicine Walk at the Ojibway Cultural Centre and Museum. We enjoyed an archaeological site at Shegwiandah and were given a tour by the archaeologist there.

In all it was a very informative week!

Music Mondays completes “best ever” 26th Season

Music Mondays, the lunchtime concert series, has completed its 26th Season. The 18 concerts ran from
1st May to 28th August, 2017.
Ian Grundy, our Artistic Director, designed an excellent season of eclectic and diverse programming which garnered many compliments from our audience, “the best ever” said one regular.
We are grateful to the Church of the Holy Trinity, for hosting the series. The church building’s acoustics are magnificent. We have a suggested an audience donation of $5.00 each to make the concerts as accessible as possible. We were delighted to welcome an average audience of 110. Many audience members met up with friends and had lunch in the café afterwards.
The Music Mondays volunteers are from many walks of life but share a common interest in and appreciation of music. They give out programs, handle the money and help the audience as needed. An audience member with photography skills takes photos of the musicians for our web site and to use in our grant application.
Our Summer Student /Concert Coordinator, Danielle Sum, who was with us for eight weeks, was a great success. She is a delightful percussion student from the University of Toronto, who was proactive, worked well with everyone and had good ideas to enhance our productions.
The Toronto Arts Council continues to support Music Mondays as we endeavour to compensate our musicians at a more appropriate level. We have slowly increased the honorarium over the past 2 years.
Ian Grundy, our Artistic Director, has done an amazing job, increasing our audiences, connecting with the best of the up and coming musicians and raising our presence in the City of Toronto by using his social media and public relations expertise.
We greatly appreciate all Ian’s work and look forward with anticipation to the 2018 season.

Submitted by Jean Robinson, Chair, Music Mondays Committee.

MICHAEL BRIDGE, DANIELLE SUM,
KORNEL WOLAK.
7th August 2017


MUSIC MONDAYS VOLUNTEERS
2017

Poetry for the Fall

These poems were submitted by Administrator Margot Linken. Says Margot, “One poem, by Marge Piercy, celebrates the Jewish holidays of Rosh Hoshanah and Yom Kippur (Sept 20-22, and Sept 30 respectively, this year) and the other by Edip Cansever, a Turkish poet, is one which I’ve always thought highly eucharistic.”

Coming Up on September
by Marge Piercy

White butterflies, with single
black fingerpaint eyes on their wings
dart and settle, eddy and mate
over the green tangle of vines
in Labor Day morning steam.
The year grinds into ripeness
and rot, grapes darkening,
pears yellowing, the first
Virginia creeper twining crimson,
the grasses, dry straw to burn.
The New Year rises, beckoning
across the umbrellas on the sand.
I begin to reconsider my life.
What is the yield of my impatience?
What is the fruit of my resolve?
I turn from the frantic white dance
over the jungle of productivity
and slowly a niggun slides,
cold water down my throat.
I rest on a leaf spotted red.
Now is the time to let the mind
search backwards like the raven loosed
to see what can feed us.
Now, the time to cast the mind forward
to chart an aerial map of the months.
The New Year*

is a great door
that stands across the evening and Yom
Kippur**
is the second door. Between them
are song and silence, stone and clay pot
to be filled from within myself.
I will find there both ripeness and rot,
What I have left done and undone,
What I must let go with the waning days
and what I must take in.
What I have done and undone,
With the last tomatoes, we harvest the fruit of our lives.

Table
by Edip Cansever
A man filled with the gladness of living
Put his keys on the table.
Put flowers in a copper bowl there.
He put his eggs and milk on the table.
He put there the light that came in through the window.
Sound of a bicycle, sound of a spinning wheel.
The softness of bread and weather he put there.
On the table the man put
Things that happened in his mind.
What he wanted to do in life.
He put that there.
Those he loved, those he didn’t love.
The man put them on the table too.
Three times three make nine.
The man put nine on the table.
He was next to the window next to the sky;
He reached out and placed on the table endlessness.
So many days he had wanted to drink a beer!
He put on the table the pouring of that beer.
He placed there his sleep and his wakefulness;
His hunger and his fullness he placed there.
Now that’s what I call a table!
It didn’t complain at all about the load.
It wobbled once or twice, then stood firm.
The man kept piling things on.

-from the Turkish of Edip Cansever (1928-1986)
translated by Richard Tillinghast

CSI Gesthemane

While I still smart with the memory of that ruler striking my left wrist many years ago, I know that this is mild compared to the abuse, rejection, death, disease and discrimination measured in a thousand brutal ways that many have experienced through misogyny, colonialism, slavery, homophobia and too many other wrongs.

The full text of Michael Shapcott’s homily from August 13 is below.

Homily13august2017

A Celebration of Life – Bonnie Briggs

A celebration of the life of Bonnie Briggs, founder of the Homeless Memorial, will take place on Sunday, September 10 at 2 pm, here at the Church of the Holy Trinity. All are welcome. Bonnie was a tireless advocate for the homeless and under-housed population of our city. Bonnie’s leadership was crucial in this on-going issue, which was coloured by her experience as someone who had lived with homelessness. 

For more on Bonnie’s legacy, please see this article from the Toronto Star: https://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2017/08/08/toronto-activist-bonnie-briggs-remembered-as-advocate-for-housing-creator-of-homeless-memorial.html

How Big is the Tent We Call Home?

How Big is the Tent We Call Home?
Notes for a Sermon by Suzanne Rumsey
Holy Trinity, August 20, 2017

From “Coming Home,” by Katharine O’Flynn. The year is about 1922; the place, southeastern British Columbia:

Fernie. Cranbrook. Yahk. His excitement grew. Here was a mountain that looked familiar. Could it be Goat? Yes. Yes. That was surely its peak. And here was the siding for the mine. Then the trainman came along the aisle shouting, ‘Creston! Creston is the next station stop. Creston next.” …The train puffed to a standstill, sending out clouds of white steam. The trainman set the nobbled brown stool on the platform, and reached up to give Charles a hand, but the boy was already running along the platform towards outstretched arms. “Gran! Gran!” he was shouting, “I’m home!” Continue reading How Big is the Tent We Call Home?

Celebrating Canada’s Long History

July 2, 10:30 am. We gather with each other and with Treaty Canoe. We will sing together, hear readings from Ryan McMahon, Christi Belcourt and the Gospel. We will reflect on our country, history and ourselves and respond as we are called and able. We will share the gifts of the land and of human hands. Please join us. Continue reading Celebrating Canada’s Long History

Walking Holy Trinity’s Parish Bounds (followed by Lunch)

Saturday, July 22, 2017 10:00 AM to 12:30 PM

The Holy Trinity Strategic Planning Committee, as part of the environmental scan phase of our process, invites you to join us for a walk around the parish boundary (Queen Street—University Avenue—College/Carlton Street—Jarvis Street). Bring a cell phone or camera to document things that catch your attention, or that might prompt further conversation later. The circuit is exactly 5 KM, and Google Maps estimates it will take an hour to walk. We will meet at Holy Trinity at 10:00 AM, head out when everyone has gathered, and return to share lunch and any reflections afterward.

Google Map here: https://tinyurl.com/ycvxwsm2

 

 

loving justice in the heart of the city