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A Journey to Manitoulin Island – notes on a voyage of reconciliation

by Maggie Panter

Coral Petzoldt and I set out on a bright Saturday morning for a trip to Manitoulin Island to Connect to the Land, a tour organized by some folks from Church of the Redeemer and Trinity St. Paul’s.

There were nine of us, three folks tented, one stayed in Little Currant, and the rest were housed in cottages overlooking the water.

We attended a church service in Kagawong, St. John the Evangelist, the mariners’ church. Fr. Aiden has five children that he is responsible for! We spoke to the head of the Historical Society in Kagawin and visited the Old Mill Heritage Centre after walking along the Bridal Veil Falls.

We visited at the Wikwemikang (Wiki) reserve. It’s the only unceded land – and are the only band to have the treaty – a judge’s ruling to prove it.

On the Whitefish River Reserve we were permitted to climb Dreamers’ Rock accompanied by a guide, a sacred site.

We toured the Debajehmujig (Storyteller’s) Theatre headquarters, including the Art Gallery and animation studio.

We saw a beautiful Roman Catholic church in M’Chigeeng. It incorporated many Indigenous symbols and artwork. We participated in a Medicine Walk at the Ojibway Cultural Centre and Museum. We enjoyed an archaeological site at Shegwiandah and were given a tour by the archaeologist there.

In all it was a very informative week!

Music Mondays completes “best ever” 26th Season

Music Mondays, the lunchtime concert series, has completed its 26th Season. The 18 concerts ran from
1st May to 28th August, 2017.
Ian Grundy, our Artistic Director, designed an excellent season of eclectic and diverse programming which garnered many compliments from our audience, “the best ever” said one regular.
We are grateful to the Church of the Holy Trinity, for hosting the series. The church building’s acoustics are magnificent. We have a suggested an audience donation of $5.00 each to make the concerts as accessible as possible. We were delighted to welcome an average audience of 110. Many audience members met up with friends and had lunch in the café afterwards.
The Music Mondays volunteers are from many walks of life but share a common interest in and appreciation of music. They give out programs, handle the money and help the audience as needed. An audience member with photography skills takes photos of the musicians for our web site and to use in our grant application.
Our Summer Student /Concert Coordinator, Danielle Sum, who was with us for eight weeks, was a great success. She is a delightful percussion student from the University of Toronto, who was proactive, worked well with everyone and had good ideas to enhance our productions.
The Toronto Arts Council continues to support Music Mondays as we endeavour to compensate our musicians at a more appropriate level. We have slowly increased the honorarium over the past 2 years.
Ian Grundy, our Artistic Director, has done an amazing job, increasing our audiences, connecting with the best of the up and coming musicians and raising our presence in the City of Toronto by using his social media and public relations expertise.
We greatly appreciate all Ian’s work and look forward with anticipation to the 2018 season.

Submitted by Jean Robinson, Chair, Music Mondays Committee.

MICHAEL BRIDGE, DANIELLE SUM,
KORNEL WOLAK.
7th August 2017


MUSIC MONDAYS VOLUNTEERS
2017

Walking With Our Sisters

Walking With Our Sisters
Website: www.walkingwithoursisters.ca
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/WWOSTO/
Twitter @wwos1 #wwos
Instagram: wwos_to

This October in Toronto, there is a very special opportunity to honour and remember the more than a thousand, Indigenous women, girls and Two Spirit people who have been murdered or remain missing. Walking With Our Sisters is a commemorative art installation hosted at the Aboriginal Education Centre, at 16 Phin Avenue, near Donlands and Danforth, from the 15th to the 29th of October.

Walking With Our Sisters is a national community based commemorative project of nearly 2,000 “vamps” — the tops of moccasins that have been intentionally left unfinished signifying the loss of unfinished lives. More than an art exhibit, this ceremony invites you on a journey to remember the losses, to honour grieving families and to work for change.

Together with the Church of the Redeemer, Holy Trinity has supported the project by covering the cost of a print run of promotional buttons that have been used for fundraising.

I hope you can find some time to visit the installation, on your own or with a friend. Taking such a journey is both heart-breaking and community mending.

Susie Henderson
(Susie has been participating on the fundraising sub-committee of the WWOS planning team.)

A Prayer for Walking With Our Sisters

Grandmother God,
Your loving intention stitched the world into being
You embroidered goodness into the pattern of all creation.
Every plant, every creature, every life reveals Your careful handiwork.
Every injustice rips at the seams of Your design.
Today we mourn Indigenous women and girls, missing and murdered —
so deeply loved by You and remembered in community.
Be with families that wait and grieve.
Be with peoples that name and honour.
Be with communities that seek Your mending justice.
We are Your beautiful and troubled creation,
teach us, restore us, and renew us,
from generation to generation.
Amen.
(by Jennifer Henry)

MORE INFORMATION

Rebeka Tabobondung interviews Christi Belcourt for MUSKRAT Magazine about the Walking with our Sisters exhibition.

 “Your community…truly showed Christ’s love to my family”

An unexpected letter

On September 12, this letter of deep gratitude landed in the parish e-mail inbox. It speaks to a time of personal and international crisis, of love, support, and the kindness of strangers.

Hello There!

Sixteen years ago during the 9/11 crisis, my family and I entered into our own personal crisis that took us unexpectedly to Toronto. We had just received news that our then 5 month old daughter needed a life saving heart transplant and the only place performing these surgeries at the time was at Sick Kids in Toronto. Needless-to-say, our own personal world was torn apart in the midst of such devastating circumstances world wide. Not only were we in a precarious situation with our daughter’s health, but we had to leave our home, friends, family and church family within days of the events of 9/11.

Because our daughter’s health did not allow us to be out in the general public much, we had a very difficult time finding community. On one desperate Sunday, we stumbled into the doors of Holy Trinity and it was like a breath of fresh air with the people of God holding us up at a very desperate time in our lives. I remember the presence of the Spirit in your church; I remember the kindness of strangers in your church; I remember the prayers of the people in that church as we formed a circle in the sanctuary. I simply remember the people of God holding my daughter, my family up in prayer.

While I wish I remembered some of the names of the beautiful people who cared for us, sadly I do not – except for Joy Kogawa, who I was a little star struck by at the time! It will be 16 years next month that my daughter received her life saving heart transplant and during this time I often think of those who shared this journey with us and am so thankful for those who have been a part of our lives, it even for a short time. So, it is with gratitude that I send a heart full of thanks to the people of your community who truly showed Christ’s love to my family and I at a very significant time in our lives. Thank you so much for teaching me in real, tangible ways, what it means to be the hands and feet of Christ. I truly hope to visit again some day.

Blessings,

Carmen C.

Celebrating Canada’s Long History

July 2, 10:30 am. We gather with each other and with Treaty Canoe. We will sing together, hear readings from Ryan McMahon, Christi Belcourt and the Gospel. We will reflect on our country, history and ourselves and respond as we are called and able. We will share the gifts of the land and of human hands. Please join us. Continue reading Celebrating Canada’s Long History

Picnic in High Park June 18

SERVICE – PICNIC

picnic-basket-150x150Sunday, June 18, 2017 @ 11:00 AM

Area 26 in High Park (directions below)

Join us and invite your friends!

Service: 11:00 AM in Area 26 at High Park, this is the only service on June 18. This will be a fun, intergenerational service in High Park. The music will be contemporary and provided by the Fallen Angles band.

  • Picnic: The parishes of San Esteban and St. Paul’s will be joining us. The three communities will be provide: BBQ’s, beverages, hamburgers & veggie burgers along with meat & veggie hotdogs.

  • Please bring a picnic side dish to share with a serving utensil. Plates, napkins, & cutlery will be provided. You may want to bring a folding chair or blanket to sit on.

Continue reading Picnic in High Park June 18

Summer positions at Holy Trinity

This summer, Church of the Holy Trinity is looking to hire two students for summer positions at our church.

A Community Worker and a Concert Co-ordinator and Vistor Guide.

Please find detailed postings attached here. Application deadline is Friday, May 26. Send cover letter and resume to ht@holytrinitytoronto.org.

From the roof of HT in 1974


An amazing image shared with us this week by the photographer William Perry.

I walked into the church with a 4×5 camera, big tripod and a couple dozen 4×5 negative cartridges, maybe 50 pounds and asked “Can I go up on the roof to take some photos” and someone took me to the staircase in the turret up to the edge of the roof and I dragged the equipment up to the peak.

[Note to any contemporary roof climbers: sorry, no. It’s not 1974]

Looking towards Yonge Street.

Canada By Treaty: Histories of a Negotiated Place

April 28 – May 25, Hart House Map Room Exhibit 

The exhibit explores treaties, those legal agreements with Indigenous peoples that allowed non-Indigenous people to live on and own land in what is now Canada. The four-week exhibit responds to the 150th anniversary of Confederation by explaining in accessible language the long history of treaty making, and how and why these agreements were essential to the foundation of modern Canada. Co-curated by fourth year undergraduate James Bird, Nehiyawak (Cree), Indigenous Studies and Architecture, and Department of History Professors Laurie Bertram and Heidi Bohaker, the exhibit draws on content created by students in Professor Bohaker’s Fall 2016 joint fourth year/graduate seminar “Canada By Treaty.”

More information at UofT website

#ICANTKEEPQUIET

Echo Women’s Choir, celebrating 25 years, continues to provide unique offerings that bridge the classical and contemporary choral spheres while always maintaining a strong commentary on issues facing our world. Their concert “We Can’t Keep Quiet!” takes its name from the #ICANTKEEPQUIET campaign created by American musician MILCK based on her song Quiet. An artist that “finds comfort in discomfort,” MILCK created the campaign to be a rallying call to break cycles of oppression and fear. The song was performed by a guerilla choir during the Women’s March on Washington, DC, on January 21, 2017.

(text from Wholenote. Read the full article here)

Echo Women’s Choir presents “We Can’t Keep Quiet!” celebrating their 25 th anniversary, Sunday, April 30, 3pm at Church of the Holy Trinity.