All posts by Kate Werneburg

Church on Fire: Burnt Door Concert

In the early hours of August 23, Holy Trinity was set on fire by an arsonist. Due to the quick thinking of someone who was sleeping in the square and who called emergency services, the church suffered no worse damage than the burning of the west door. We are very grateful to him for taking action to save the church.

A temporary door has been installed, and the west entrance remains out of commission. The police have detained the person alleged to have set the fire.

To replace the doors will cost of $30 000 overall, and we as a parish must come up with the deductible of $2500. To support this goal, the Burnt Door Concert is being planned for October 20th at 7:30 pm. It will be an eclectic mix of pop and classical music. Mark your calendars! Tickets are available at http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/3094438

See the link below to hear the individual tell what happened on the night of the fire.

Toronto police investigating 6 downtown fires; suspect arrested

Poetry for the Fall

These poems were submitted by Administrator Margot Linken. Says Margot, “One poem, by Marge Piercy, celebrates the Jewish holidays of Rosh Hoshanah and Yom Kippur (Sept 20-22, and Sept 30 respectively, this year) and the other by Edip Cansever, a Turkish poet, is one which I’ve always thought highly eucharistic.”

Coming Up on September
by Marge Piercy

White butterflies, with single
black fingerpaint eyes on their wings
dart and settle, eddy and mate
over the green tangle of vines
in Labor Day morning steam.
The year grinds into ripeness
and rot, grapes darkening,
pears yellowing, the first
Virginia creeper twining crimson,
the grasses, dry straw to burn.
The New Year rises, beckoning
across the umbrellas on the sand.
I begin to reconsider my life.
What is the yield of my impatience?
What is the fruit of my resolve?
I turn from the frantic white dance
over the jungle of productivity
and slowly a niggun slides,
cold water down my throat.
I rest on a leaf spotted red.
Now is the time to let the mind
search backwards like the raven loosed
to see what can feed us.
Now, the time to cast the mind forward
to chart an aerial map of the months.
The New Year*

is a great door
that stands across the evening and Yom
Kippur**
is the second door. Between them
are song and silence, stone and clay pot
to be filled from within myself.
I will find there both ripeness and rot,
What I have left done and undone,
What I must let go with the waning days
and what I must take in.
What I have done and undone,
With the last tomatoes, we harvest the fruit of our lives.

Table
by Edip Cansever
A man filled with the gladness of living
Put his keys on the table.
Put flowers in a copper bowl there.
He put his eggs and milk on the table.
He put there the light that came in through the window.
Sound of a bicycle, sound of a spinning wheel.
The softness of bread and weather he put there.
On the table the man put
Things that happened in his mind.
What he wanted to do in life.
He put that there.
Those he loved, those he didn’t love.
The man put them on the table too.
Three times three make nine.
The man put nine on the table.
He was next to the window next to the sky;
He reached out and placed on the table endlessness.
So many days he had wanted to drink a beer!
He put on the table the pouring of that beer.
He placed there his sleep and his wakefulness;
His hunger and his fullness he placed there.
Now that’s what I call a table!
It didn’t complain at all about the load.
It wobbled once or twice, then stood firm.
The man kept piling things on.

-from the Turkish of Edip Cansever (1928-1986)
translated by Richard Tillinghast

CSI Gesthemane

While I still smart with the memory of that ruler striking my left wrist many years ago, I know that this is mild compared to the abuse, rejection, death, disease and discrimination measured in a thousand brutal ways that many have experienced through misogyny, colonialism, slavery, homophobia and too many other wrongs.

The full text of Michael Shapcott’s homily from August 13 is below.

Homily13august2017

A Celebration of Life – Bonnie Briggs

A celebration of the life of Bonnie Briggs, founder of the Homeless Memorial, will take place on Sunday, September 10 at 2 pm, here at the Church of the Holy Trinity. All are welcome. Bonnie was a tireless advocate for the homeless and under-housed population of our city. Bonnie’s leadership was crucial in this on-going issue, which was coloured by her experience as someone who had lived with homelessness. 

For more on Bonnie’s legacy, please see this article from the Toronto Star: https://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2017/08/08/toronto-activist-bonnie-briggs-remembered-as-advocate-for-housing-creator-of-homeless-memorial.html

How Big is the Tent We Call Home?

How Big is the Tent We Call Home?
Notes for a Sermon by Suzanne Rumsey
Holy Trinity, August 20, 2017

From “Coming Home,” by Katharine O’Flynn. The year is about 1922; the place, southeastern British Columbia:

Fernie. Cranbrook. Yahk. His excitement grew. Here was a mountain that looked familiar. Could it be Goat? Yes. Yes. That was surely its peak. And here was the siding for the mine. Then the trainman came along the aisle shouting, ‘Creston! Creston is the next station stop. Creston next.” …The train puffed to a standstill, sending out clouds of white steam. The trainman set the nobbled brown stool on the platform, and reached up to give Charles a hand, but the boy was already running along the platform towards outstretched arms. “Gran! Gran!” he was shouting, “I’m home!” Continue reading How Big is the Tent We Call Home?

Walking Holy Trinity’s Parish Bounds (followed by Lunch)

Saturday, July 22, 2017 10:00 AM to 12:30 PM

The Holy Trinity Strategic Planning Committee, as part of the environmental scan phase of our process, invites you to join us for a walk around the parish boundary (Queen Street—University Avenue—College/Carlton Street—Jarvis Street). Bring a cell phone or camera to document things that catch your attention, or that might prompt further conversation later. The circuit is exactly 5 KM, and Google Maps estimates it will take an hour to walk. We will meet at Holy Trinity at 10:00 AM, head out when everyone has gathered, and return to share lunch and any reflections afterward.

Google Map here: https://tinyurl.com/ycvxwsm2

 

 

Annual Book Sale! June 22 and June 23

UPDATE: Thank you to everyone who came to our official sale days! We still have some wonderful treasures on offer, so if you’re passing the church Mon 1:30 – 3 pm and Tues – Fri 11-3 pm,  find a great read and continue to support refugees!

On June 22 and 23, join us under the leafy trees of Trinity Square to browse and purchase gently used books in support of the Refugee Committee. Find a quick read or an everlasting treasure!