Category Archives: history

Walking Holy Trinity’s Parish Bounds (followed by Lunch)

Saturday, July 22, 2017 10:00 AM to 12:30 PM

The Holy Trinity Strategic Planning Committee, as part of the environmental scan phase of our process, invites you to join us for a walk around the parish boundary (Queen Street—University Avenue—College/Carlton Street—Jarvis Street). Bring a cell phone or camera to document things that catch your attention, or that might prompt further conversation later. The circuit is exactly 5 KM, and Google Maps estimates it will take an hour to walk. We will meet at Holy Trinity at 10:00 AM, head out when everyone has gathered, and return to share lunch and any reflections afterward.

Google Map here: https://tinyurl.com/ycvxwsm2

 

 

Treaty Canoe at Holy Trinity

Treaty Canoe

Treaty Canoe by Alex McKay (1999, 12’x24”x32”,) is a performance/sculpture/installation that is made from cedar, copper wire, birch bark, red-ribbon, glue, and treaties hand-penned onto hand-made linen paper. Using dip pen and ink, treaties were performatively transcribed by many hands.

Keith, and the Treaty People circle have been working to bring an art installation called Treaty Canoe (Alex McKay, artist) to Holy Trinity as part of our journey toward reconciliation. Most recently displayed publicly at Osgoode Law School early last year, this piece was created in 1999, long before ‘reconciliation’ entered the general public’s mind as an idea. Encumbered, as so much of reconciliation work is, by conversations of appropriation and our understanding of history and relationship, this work will help us become more aware of the treaties which enable the existence of Canada and our responsibilities to each other.

We are hoping this will allow us to engage more of the public in the conversation as they visit our space and see Treaty Canoe suspended from our ceiling, just out of reach. We would welcome the help of any members of the HT community in interpreting and spreading the word–whether you are part of People Presence, the Sunday worship group, the refugee committee, Christmas Story, hospice, housing, or one of “the guys.”

We’re still finalising details, but are hoping that the installation will begin before the end of June and run into mid-September.

Artist’s statement:

Volunteers, most having never read a treaty, in a de-colonial gesture, undertook a close reading, and then reluctantly and poignantly signed the contracts in the stead of their original faithful negotiators.

Treaty Canoe speaks of mutual, sacred bonds of honour and makes clear that we are all treaty people. When exhibited it hangs by a thread balanced on a central pivot point above its centre thwart. It responds to the slightest breeze of a passer-by, rocking and turning. Lit from above the craft becomes translucent; in casting a shadow it becomes two canoes, floating in the same current on separate but parallel courses. The transcription process is one of claiming ownership, and responsibility, if not for the past, then the present and future of our relationship.

We are all treaty people”

Alex McKay

 

From the roof of HT in 1974


An amazing image shared with us this week by the photographer William Perry.

I walked into the church with a 4×5 camera, big tripod and a couple dozen 4×5 negative cartridges, maybe 50 pounds and asked “Can I go up on the roof to take some photos” and someone took me to the staircase in the turret up to the edge of the roof and I dragged the equipment up to the peak.

[Note to any contemporary roof climbers: sorry, no. It’s not 1974]

Looking towards Yonge Street.

Canada By Treaty: Histories of a Negotiated Place

April 28 – May 25, Hart House Map Room Exhibit 

The exhibit explores treaties, those legal agreements with Indigenous peoples that allowed non-Indigenous people to live on and own land in what is now Canada. The four-week exhibit responds to the 150th anniversary of Confederation by explaining in accessible language the long history of treaty making, and how and why these agreements were essential to the foundation of modern Canada. Co-curated by fourth year undergraduate James Bird, Nehiyawak (Cree), Indigenous Studies and Architecture, and Department of History Professors Laurie Bertram and Heidi Bohaker, the exhibit draws on content created by students in Professor Bohaker’s Fall 2016 joint fourth year/graduate seminar “Canada By Treaty.”

More information at UofT website

Walking Taddle Creek @ Church of the Holy Trinity

When: Saturday, April 29 at 10:45 AM

Meet: Church of the Holy Trinity, 19 Trinity Square

As part of our exploration of the land we are a part of and its history, we will be taking a walk along Taddle Creek with Helen Mills of Lost Rivers. We hope that anyone who considers themselves part of our neighbourhood will join us as we ground ourselves in this place.

This walk is part of a larger project of understanding ourselves as part of this land. You can read more about that here.

Taddle Creek has been out of sight a long time, but there have been a number of articles and efforts to bring it back to light. Here is a post on BlogTO from 2012

We plan to leave promptly at 11am and return for lunch at 1pm. Please RSVP to knunn@holytrinitytoronto.org if you intend to come.

becoming part of the land

As part of our ongoing work and hope for reconciliation with indigenous people, we realise that we need to change our understanding of who we are and to whom we belong. Through the season of Lent this year, we will be exploring our relationship with the land we share–the land our building is part of, the land we live on, the other people who share this land.

We invite any and all who share this place with us to join us in this process:

More information will be added to this page as details firm up. If you would like to  be notified of specifics or to ask questions, feel free to contact Keith at knunn@holytrinitytoronto.org

Final four shows Thursday, Friday, Saturday!

This dramatisation of the nativity story has been performed every December since 1938. It was first performed at St. Martin’s-in-the-fields in London and brought to Toronto complete with script and costumes by Patricia Frank who was the daughter of St. Martin’s vicar and then married his student John Frank who became priest at Holy Trinity. 2016 performances:

Evening shows 7:30 PM:  Thursday, December 22 and Friday, December 23

Afternoon shows 4:30 PM: Saturday, December 24

Special for this year! Christmas Eve at 1:30 PM

Book Tickets

“Gently to Nagasaki— The Toronto Book Launch” Thursday, Nov 10 7:30 PM

Thursday, November 10 7:30 PM “Gently to Nagasaki— The Toronto Book Launch” at The Church of Holy Trinity (19 Trinity Sq, Toronto, ON, M5G 1B1). Free admission and open to the public. Books available for sale by Ben McNally Books. No RSVP required.
Joy Kogawa will be joined on stage by Mary Jo Leddy, CM. Both authors will speak to their deep knowledge of forgiveness, assuredness, and trust in the context of today’s desires of repairing personal and cultural relationships. Both events are truly accessible masterclasses on self-healing and sincerity. More info available

Another related event is taking place on Friday, October 28 at 4 PM “A Dream of Reconciliation,” a conversation between Joy Kogawa, Bishop Patrick Yu, and Olivia Chow. Hosted by Caitlin Press and The Cheng Yu Tung East Asian Library at the Cheng Yu Tung East Asian Library (8th floor, Robarts Library, 130 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A5).
Admission is free. Light refreshments provided. All are welcome. Books will be available for sale by Nikkei Books. The author will be available for signing. Reserve your seat