Category Archives: Justice Issues

A Journey to Manitoulin Island – notes on a voyage of reconciliation

by Maggie Panter

Coral Petzoldt and I set out on a bright Saturday morning for a trip to Manitoulin Island to Connect to the Land, a tour organized by some folks from Church of the Redeemer and Trinity St. Paul’s.

There were nine of us, three folks tented, one stayed in Little Currant, and the rest were housed in cottages overlooking the water.

We attended a church service in Kagawong, St. John the Evangelist, the mariners’ church. Fr. Aiden has five children that he is responsible for! We spoke to the head of the Historical Society in Kagawin and visited the Old Mill Heritage Centre after walking along the Bridal Veil Falls.

We visited at the Wikwemikang (Wiki) reserve. It’s the only unceded land – and are the only band to have the treaty – a judge’s ruling to prove it.

On the Whitefish River Reserve we were permitted to climb Dreamers’ Rock accompanied by a guide, a sacred site.

We toured the Debajehmujig (Storyteller’s) Theatre headquarters, including the Art Gallery and animation studio.

We saw a beautiful Roman Catholic church in M’Chigeeng. It incorporated many Indigenous symbols and artwork. We participated in a Medicine Walk at the Ojibway Cultural Centre and Museum. We enjoyed an archaeological site at Shegwiandah and were given a tour by the archaeologist there.

In all it was a very informative week!

Walking With Our Sisters

Walking With Our Sisters
Website: www.walkingwithoursisters.ca
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/WWOSTO/
Twitter @wwos1 #wwos
Instagram: wwos_to

This October in Toronto, there is a very special opportunity to honour and remember the more than a thousand, Indigenous women, girls and Two Spirit people who have been murdered or remain missing. Walking With Our Sisters is a commemorative art installation hosted at the Aboriginal Education Centre, at 16 Phin Avenue, near Donlands and Danforth, from the 15th to the 29th of October.

Walking With Our Sisters is a national community based commemorative project of nearly 2,000 “vamps” — the tops of moccasins that have been intentionally left unfinished signifying the loss of unfinished lives. More than an art exhibit, this ceremony invites you on a journey to remember the losses, to honour grieving families and to work for change.

Together with the Church of the Redeemer, Holy Trinity has supported the project by covering the cost of a print run of promotional buttons that have been used for fundraising.

I hope you can find some time to visit the installation, on your own or with a friend. Taking such a journey is both heart-breaking and community mending.

Susie Henderson
(Susie has been participating on the fundraising sub-committee of the WWOS planning team.)

A Prayer for Walking With Our Sisters

Grandmother God,
Your loving intention stitched the world into being
You embroidered goodness into the pattern of all creation.
Every plant, every creature, every life reveals Your careful handiwork.
Every injustice rips at the seams of Your design.
Today we mourn Indigenous women and girls, missing and murdered —
so deeply loved by You and remembered in community.
Be with families that wait and grieve.
Be with peoples that name and honour.
Be with communities that seek Your mending justice.
We are Your beautiful and troubled creation,
teach us, restore us, and renew us,
from generation to generation.
Amen.
(by Jennifer Henry)

MORE INFORMATION

Rebeka Tabobondung interviews Christi Belcourt for MUSKRAT Magazine about the Walking with our Sisters exhibition.

Celebrating Canada’s Long History

July 2, 10:30 am. We gather with each other and with Treaty Canoe. We will sing together, hear readings from Ryan McMahon, Christi Belcourt and the Gospel. We will reflect on our country, history and ourselves and respond as we are called and able. We will share the gifts of the land and of human hands. Please join us. Continue reading Celebrating Canada’s Long History

Walking Holy Trinity’s Parish Bounds (followed by Lunch)

Saturday, July 22, 2017 10:00 AM to 12:30 PM

The Holy Trinity Strategic Planning Committee, as part of the environmental scan phase of our process, invites you to join us for a walk around the parish boundary (Queen Street—University Avenue—College/Carlton Street—Jarvis Street). Bring a cell phone or camera to document things that catch your attention, or that might prompt further conversation later. The circuit is exactly 5 KM, and Google Maps estimates it will take an hour to walk. We will meet at Holy Trinity at 10:00 AM, head out when everyone has gathered, and return to share lunch and any reflections afterward.

Google Map here: https://tinyurl.com/ycvxwsm2

 

 

New Numbers Tell It All: Lack of housing is killing Torontonians

The new official numbers of homeless deaths from the City of Toronto released in late May were sad confirmation for those who have been gathering every month for almost two decades at Holy Trinity’s Homeless Memorial.
Toronto Public Health has reported that 27 people who were homeless died from January to March of 2017 – that’s a rate of more than two per week. If this pace continues, then more than 100 homeless deaths will be recorded this year – a record for Toronto.
People have been gathering around a plain gray memorial at the south side of Holy Trinity on the second Tuesday of every month at 12 noon. They remember, by name, the women, men and children who died from homelessness over the previous month. Continue reading New Numbers Tell It All: Lack of housing is killing Torontonians

Treaty Canoe at Holy Trinity

Treaty Canoe

Treaty Canoe by Alex McKay (1999, 12’x24”x32”,) is a performance/sculpture/installation that is made from cedar, copper wire, birch bark, red-ribbon, glue, and treaties hand-penned onto hand-made linen paper. Using dip pen and ink, treaties were performatively transcribed by many hands.

Keith, and the Treaty People circle have been working to bring an art installation called Treaty Canoe (Alex McKay, artist) to Holy Trinity as part of our journey toward reconciliation. Most recently displayed publicly at Osgoode Law School early last year, this piece was created in 1999, long before ‘reconciliation’ entered the general public’s mind as an idea. Encumbered, as so much of reconciliation work is, by conversations of appropriation and our understanding of history and relationship, this work will help us become more aware of the treaties which enable the existence of Canada and our responsibilities to each other.

We are hoping this will allow us to engage more of the public in the conversation as they visit our space and see Treaty Canoe suspended from our ceiling, just out of reach. We would welcome the help of any members of the HT community in interpreting and spreading the word–whether you are part of People Presence, the Sunday worship group, the refugee committee, Christmas Story, hospice, housing, or one of “the guys.”

We’re still finalising details, but are hoping that the installation will begin before the end of June and run into mid-September.

Artist’s statement:

Volunteers, most having never read a treaty, in a de-colonial gesture, undertook a close reading, and then reluctantly and poignantly signed the contracts in the stead of their original faithful negotiators.

Treaty Canoe speaks of mutual, sacred bonds of honour and makes clear that we are all treaty people. When exhibited it hangs by a thread balanced on a central pivot point above its centre thwart. It responds to the slightest breeze of a passer-by, rocking and turning. Lit from above the craft becomes translucent; in casting a shadow it becomes two canoes, floating in the same current on separate but parallel courses. The transcription process is one of claiming ownership, and responsibility, if not for the past, then the present and future of our relationship.

We are all treaty people”

Alex McKay

 

Niigaani-gichigami: Gratitude Walk and Festival, June 16th

Friday, June 16th,

6pm Sherbourne Waterfront

7pm BBQ St. James Park, King and Church St.

We would be honoured to have your presence amongst us in prayer and witness as we seek to come together as a diverse community to acknowledge our interdependence on one another, our faith traditions, the land, and the water we live on. This festival is interfaith and intends to express gratitude for Lake Ontario (Niigaani-gichigami in Anishnawbe, Ontario is the Huron-Wendat name). The June 16th Gratitude Walk and Festival will begin with  Loreen Blu Waters opening us in a water ceremony, followed by prayers and songs offered by different faith leaders. Continue reading Niigaani-gichigami: Gratitude Walk and Festival, June 16th

Summer positions at Holy Trinity

This summer, Church of the Holy Trinity is looking to hire two students for summer positions at our church.

A Community Worker and a Concert Co-ordinator and Vistor Guide.

Please find detailed postings attached here. Application deadline is Friday, May 26. Send cover letter and resume to ht@holytrinitytoronto.org.

Canada By Treaty: Histories of a Negotiated Place

April 28 – May 25, Hart House Map Room Exhibit 

The exhibit explores treaties, those legal agreements with Indigenous peoples that allowed non-Indigenous people to live on and own land in what is now Canada. The four-week exhibit responds to the 150th anniversary of Confederation by explaining in accessible language the long history of treaty making, and how and why these agreements were essential to the foundation of modern Canada. Co-curated by fourth year undergraduate James Bird, Nehiyawak (Cree), Indigenous Studies and Architecture, and Department of History Professors Laurie Bertram and Heidi Bohaker, the exhibit draws on content created by students in Professor Bohaker’s Fall 2016 joint fourth year/graduate seminar “Canada By Treaty.”

More information at UofT website