Tag Archives: history

Celebrating Canada’s Long History

July 2, 10:30 am. We gather with each other and with Treaty Canoe. We will sing together, hear readings from Ryan McMahon, Christi Belcourt and the Gospel. We will reflect on our country, history and ourselves and respond as we are called and able. We will share the gifts of the land and of human hands. Please join us. Continue reading Celebrating Canada’s Long History

Canada By Treaty: Histories of a Negotiated Place

April 28 – May 25, Hart House Map Room Exhibit 

The exhibit explores treaties, those legal agreements with Indigenous peoples that allowed non-Indigenous people to live on and own land in what is now Canada. The four-week exhibit responds to the 150th anniversary of Confederation by explaining in accessible language the long history of treaty making, and how and why these agreements were essential to the foundation of modern Canada. Co-curated by fourth year undergraduate James Bird, Nehiyawak (Cree), Indigenous Studies and Architecture, and Department of History Professors Laurie Bertram and Heidi Bohaker, the exhibit draws on content created by students in Professor Bohaker’s Fall 2016 joint fourth year/graduate seminar “Canada By Treaty.”

More information at UofT website

Holy Trinity Opens its Doors May 27 & 28

Drop by any time on Saturday May 27th from 11 AM to 3 PM or Sunday, May 28th noon to 3 PM.

Experience the grandeur of our space. Listen to our instruments. Learn about our history and our present with displays of stories and pictures. Take time for a tour or scavenger hunt.

On Saturday from noon to 2 PM Ian Grundy, music director and some students he works with will play both the organ and new Steinway piano.

At 2:00 PM hear the Penthelia Singers perform a 30 minute Concert.  Penthelia Singers is a Toronto-based women’s chamber choir performing culturally diverse and musically sophisticated repertoire.  Their performance at Doors Open will include music selections from their upcoming concert, “In the Kitchen”, including the toe-tapping folk music of Eastern Canada and much more. www.penthelia.com

New door hooks

Ever wondered what keeps our doors open?

We recently received new hooks forged by a son of the parish, Constable Joel Houston.  Did we mention that Constable Houston is part of the mounted unit for the Toronto Police Service? Deluxe delivery service as well as manufacturing the hooks.

Have a look at the process from horseshoe to door below:

horseshoe before it becomes hook

 

 

hook being forged

 

Joel Houston at the forge

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Constable Joel Houston hands over new hooks

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Constable Joel Houston hands over hooks to Margot Linken, administrator and Ryan Poole, caretaker installs them.

Ryan installs new hook

 

 

 

new hook

 

“Lost but not Forgotten” Memorial at the Huronia Regional Centre cemetery on Sunday May 8th

On behalf of survivors and allies in Remember Every Name, I want to invite you to the “Lost but not Forgotten” Memorial at the Huronia Regional Centre cemetery on Sunday May 8th.

This will take place from 1:30 to 4:00 PM at Huronia Regional Centre Cemetery 650 Memorial Avenue Orillia.

Lots of details on their Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/events/252014511814115/

or contact remembereveryname@gmail.com or 705-645-0298
Poster B&W

We would welcome Holy Trinity and any other faith group people to say a blessing – in whatever tradition is theirs. Survivors say that most people were buried in this cemetery without funerals. They remember that their friends just disappeared.

Feb 11 7:00 PM – Victoria Freeman speaks What does it mean to say we are “treaty people” in Toronto?

JOIN Victoria Freeman and Zachary Smith

at the Church of the Holy Trinity
Trinity Square, Toronto (west of the Eaton Centre)

What does it mean to say we are “treaty people” in Toronto?

What are the treaty relationships that shape (or could/should shape) relationships between Indigenous peoples and between Indigenous peoples and newcomers in the Toronto area?

Victoria Freeman is the author of Distant Relations: How My Ancestors Colonized North America, and teaches in the History and Canadian Studies Programs at York University. Her 2010 dissertation, “‘Toronto Has No History!’ Indigeneity, Settler Colonialism and Historical Memory in Canada’s Largest City,” focused on the Indigenous and colonial history of the Greater Toronto Area. She is also a member of First Story Toronto,  based at the Native Canadian Centre of Toronto, and has been a long-time activist working to further decolonization and reconciliation, including through the arts.

Zachary Smith is a second year PhD student in the Department of History at the University of Toronto where he studies Indigenous political history, and treaty-making in the Great Lakes. Of Anishinaabe ancestry, he has also worked as a researcher for Chiefs of Ontario.

Thursday, February 11th at 7:00 PM
(light supper at 6:00 in the Cafe)

You are encouraged to read these articles in preparation for Thursday’s conversations.

History of a Friendship – freeman

Indigenous Hauntings – freeman

One Hundred and Sixty-Eight Years of Social Justice

October 28th is the Feast of Saint Simon and Saint Jude. It was on the eve of this day in 1847 that the Church of the Holy Trinity was consecrated. At the midweek Eucharist today we remembered Simon and Jude, and as I was reading aloud the biographical comment in For All the Saints, I realized how appropriate they are as patrons. “Simon was called ‘the Zealot,’ which suggests that he once belonged to the Jewish resistance movement. …Jude is considered the patron saint of what is shunned by the world, especially lost causes and those who suffer from incurable diseases.” [p. 318]

On Wednesdays, in place of a homily, we have a group reflection on the appointed scripture readings, on the person/s being commemorated, or on what God is doing in our lives or the world around us. The gospel reading from John 15 included this passage: “If they persecuted me, they will persecute you.One of the Wednesday regulars, Matt indexMcGeachy, related the time from his university experience when the journalist June Callwood spoke to his class about the first time she was arrested for her social justice activism. Ms Callwood was participating in a demonstration on Bloor Street when she saw the police grab a black man and pull him into an alley to give him a beating. She went into the alley and demanded to know why they were doing this. They told her it wasn’t any of her business. She responded that they were public servants–members of the Toronto Police Services–so yes, it was her business. She was arrested for obstructing the police in the performance of their duties. (No cell phone videos in those days.) Continue reading One Hundred and Sixty-Eight Years of Social Justice

Bicycle Blessing & Doors Open this Sunday, May 24th

HTvideo

The church will be open at noon as part of Great Gulf Doors Open Toronto.  We will  be holding a Bicycle Blessing at 12:30 PM outside the west doors of the church. This year’s theme is Recreation, Sport, & Leisure. We invite you to visit the church, enjoy some time of re-creation for your soul and celebrate the spirituality of physical movement and the history of this place. There will be music:

  • 12:00 – 12:20 Fallen Angles play
  • 12:30 – 12:50 Ian G playing and demonstrating organ
  • 1:00 – 1:20 Michael S & Marty duo
  • 1:20 – 2:15 Penthelia Singers will perform a 45 minutes concert of selections from our spring concert, “Music of the Americas
  • 2:20 – 4:30 organ played and demonstrated