Tag Archives: justice

discovery

The second Monday in October is marked as Thanksgiving in Canada, and Columbus Day in many states in the United States of America. In recognition of the brutal, on-going history of colonization across Turtle Island, parishioner Len Desroches offers this poem.  

by Len Desroches

Columbus, if only you had not been so afraid of discovery
Christopher, “Christ bearer,” if only you had discovered soul
discovered soul before rushing off
in gunboat for Spanish empire
stealing land
shedding rivers of blood
to mine shiny bits from Earth’s bleeding bowels

re-writing Gold with a capital “G”
made it easy to also leave out the “l”
Gold became God
Gold becomes God

Continue reading discovery

“May we be courageous today. May we learn today. May we love today.”

 June 10, 2018 – Church of Holy Trinity, Trinity Square

Our sisters and brothers at the Corrymeela Community, Northern Ireland’s longest-serving centre for peace and reconciliation, begin their day with these words:

“We resolve to live life in its fullness:

We will welcome the people who’ll be part of this day.

We will greet God in ordinary and hidden moments.”

What a remarkable story from the Book of Samuel. The elders of Israel complain to Samuel about the judges who were the government of the day. Israel was a group of scattered tribes under attack by the Philistines. The elders wanted a strong man for protection.

Continue reading “May we be courageous today. May we learn today. May we love today.”

Fleshing out some Big Ideas

At the end of April a number of Big Ideas were put in front of the community to get the juices flowing. No decision was made, but a very simple process of stickers and markers was used to test basic enthusiasm. There was sufficient positive interest in all the ideas to be worth some further development and discussion. If you’d like to be involved in developing any of these ideas, reach out to the person whose name is on it or contact knunn@holytrinity.to and I’ll put you in touch with the right people.

Continue reading Fleshing out some Big Ideas

From Sunday Breakfast to Good Friday

Volunteer Co-ordinator Kate Werneburg spoke with Jonathan Robart, a Sunday Breakfast Host, and a member of the Permanent Toronto Homeless Memorial Planning Committee. This year, he led the Second Station in the  Ecumenical Good Friday Walk for Justice. Jonathan is a Poverty and Tenant Rights lawyer with Legal Aid.  

KW: How did you first get involved with Holy Trinity?

JR: I applied to Beth Baskin –  I sent a general e-mail about three years ago. I was initially interested in volunteering with the Homeless Memorial, because it relates to the job that I do. My clients tend to be marginalized tenants; they are often being evicted into homelessness. My first volunteer role was ushering with the Christmas Story, and then my partner Alana and I  became Sunday Breakfast hosts.

KW: How has your experience of being in the community changed over the years?

JR: I’ve found my time here to be a really humbling experience. The church community has always been warm, inviting, and welcoming. I find the spiritual context of this work to be grounding. I’m not particularly religious, but the context gives me perspective. I enjoy talking with the folks who drop in, and I find its a really great way to give back. For me, it’s about more than offering time or money, it’s about being able to offer folks a safe, warm, welcoming place with food. Most of the people who drop in on Sunday probably didn’t sleep well the night before. I get a huge sense of relief from them when they enter the space.

KW: How have you found being part of the community, but not attending  worship? Do you feel integrated at Holy Trinity?

JR: I feel very integrated here. I don’t feel pressure to join worship, but being amidst the worshiping community has given me a lot to think about in terms of spirituality; I’ve picked it up by osmosis. I’ve never felt like an outsider here.

KW: How did you get involved with this year’s Good Friday Walk?

JR: Sherman asked me through my volunteering with the Homeless Memorial committee. They needed someone to speak to the legal dimensions of poverty, and my work touches all parts of poverty. In preparation, I made sure I integrated biblical passages, I did some research and googling – Isaiah has a lot to say about justice! I was trying to bridge my world and the religious experience that many have on the Good Friday Walk. As I was speaking, I could see heads shaking, I could hear gasping; it seemed to me like the content of the Safe Streets Acts was news to some out there. My plan was to integrate, educate, and even agitate a little. For many on the Walk,   many of these laws will never affect them directly. So many of our laws only apply to the poor: eviction hearings in absentia, panhandling, and more. I was so humbled to be asked to do this Station, and it was a huge privilege.

Kw: Is there anything else you’d like to say about being volunteering at Holy Trinity?

JR: I cannot stress how welcoming the church has been for us.

Photos: Good Friday Walk for Justice

This past Good Friday, March 30, 2018, Holy Trinity hosted parts of the Ecumenical Good Friday Walk for Justice.

About the walk: “The Ecumenical Good Friday Walk for Justice began 35 years ago.  Each year, the ecumenical planning team creates a map of stations to lift up current struggles. Over the years, we have stopped at the courthouse steps to protest racial profiling, at bank towers to repent valuing profits over people, and in back alleys to hear the stories of the poor. We have stood with refugees, advocated for missing and murdered Aboriginal women, and worshiped with the Occupy movement.

See photos from this year’s walk below:

2018 Photos from the Walk