Tag Archives: justice

Sour Grapes

By James Harbeck

Sermon, Holy Trinity, October 1, 2017

Readings: Ezekiel 18:1–4, 25–32; Psalm 25:1–10; Philippians 2:1–13; Matthew 21: 23–32

I’m going to tell a little story today. I don’t know whether I’d call it a parable. It’s not quite a literal history. But it’s close enough.

There was, once, a place that was very nice. Lush. Great for growing grapes and things like that. There was a family living there, and they were pretty happy with it. We’ll call them the Ones. Nothing’s perfect, but, you know, the Ones had food, family, all the things that people do with their time when nothing and no one is forcing them to do something else. Life was good enough.

And then another family showed up from another place. We’ll call them the Twos. They liked where the Ones were living. They wanted to live there. They didn’t say, “Hey, do you mind if we fit in here somehow?” or “What can we give you in exchange for some of what you have so we can live here?” They said, “Hi. We’re the Twos. These are guns. Look what they can do: [BANG BANG BANG]. Get the idea? We want this land. Oh, you? You can get out and live somewhere else, or you can stay and work for us.” Some of the Ones left. Some were killed. Some decided to stay and work for the Twos, because at least they’d still be in this nice place getting the benefit of the land. Continue reading Sour Grapes

Walking With Our Sisters

Walking With Our Sisters
Website: www.walkingwithoursisters.ca
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/WWOSTO/
Twitter @wwos1 #wwos
Instagram: wwos_to

This October in Toronto, there is a very special opportunity to honour and remember the more than a thousand, Indigenous women, girls and Two Spirit people who have been murdered or remain missing. Walking With Our Sisters is a commemorative art installation hosted at the Aboriginal Education Centre, at 16 Phin Avenue, near Donlands and Danforth, from the 15th to the 22th of October.

Walking With Our Sisters is a national community based commemorative project of nearly 2,000 “vamps” — the tops of moccasins that have been intentionally left unfinished signifying the loss of unfinished lives. More than an art exhibit, this ceremony invites you on a journey to remember the losses, to honour grieving families and to work for change. Continue reading Walking With Our Sisters

Celebrating Canada’s Long History

July 2, 10:30 am. We gather with each other and with Treaty Canoe. We will sing together, hear readings from Ryan McMahon, Christi Belcourt and the Gospel. We will reflect on our country, history and ourselves and respond as we are called and able. We will share the gifts of the land and of human hands. Please join us. Continue reading Celebrating Canada’s Long History

Summer positions at Holy Trinity

This summer, Church of the Holy Trinity is looking to hire two students for summer positions at our church.

A Community Worker and a Concert Co-ordinator and Vistor Guide.

Please find detailed postings attached here. Application deadline is Friday, May 26. Send cover letter and resume to ht@holytrinitytoronto.org.

Canada By Treaty: Histories of a Negotiated Place

April 28 – May 25, Hart House Map Room Exhibit 

The exhibit explores treaties, those legal agreements with Indigenous peoples that allowed non-Indigenous people to live on and own land in what is now Canada. The four-week exhibit responds to the 150th anniversary of Confederation by explaining in accessible language the long history of treaty making, and how and why these agreements were essential to the foundation of modern Canada. Co-curated by fourth year undergraduate James Bird, Nehiyawak (Cree), Indigenous Studies and Architecture, and Department of History Professors Laurie Bertram and Heidi Bohaker, the exhibit draws on content created by students in Professor Bohaker’s Fall 2016 joint fourth year/graduate seminar “Canada By Treaty.”

More information at UofT website

#ICANTKEEPQUIET

Echo Women’s Choir, celebrating 25 years, continues to provide unique offerings that bridge the classical and contemporary choral spheres while always maintaining a strong commentary on issues facing our world. Their concert “We Can’t Keep Quiet!” takes its name from the #ICANTKEEPQUIET campaign created by American musician MILCK based on her song Quiet. An artist that “finds comfort in discomfort,” MILCK created the campaign to be a rallying call to break cycles of oppression and fear. The song was performed by a guerilla choir during the Women’s March on Washington, DC, on January 21, 2017.

(text from Wholenote. Read the full article here)

Echo Women’s Choir presents “We Can’t Keep Quiet!” celebrating their 25 th anniversary, Sunday, April 30, 3pm at Church of the Holy Trinity.

A sip of ancient water

March 19, 2017; Holy Trinity.
Exodus 17: 1-7; John 4: 5-42

I’m sharing this image today by Issac Murcdoch on the pulpit in gratitude and respect to all the water keepers who are currently on the front lines of the struggle to protect sacred water. I made a small
handout on the 2017 Water Walk with Josephine Mandarin if you would like to know more.

Water is primal.

If you think about it, this planet should really be called water, not earth, since more than 70% of the surface is water, not land. Water — there there can be no life without it. Our bodies are 60% water – we are made of it. It’s the building block of our cells, the body’s transport system, a shock-absorber, it helps to regulate our temperature. Just give your hands a squeeze together and remind yourself that we are full of water – hopefully this doesn’t cause a mass exodus to the bathroom. Here’s the cool part, or the scary part, depending on which way it goes, not only are we full of water, but we are full of the water that’s around us. So if you’ve lived your life in Toronto, your body is 60% full of Lake Ontario.

Every time I hear it, I also find it quite marvellous to remember that the overall amount of water on the planet has remained the same for the last billion years. So we are made of the water that dinosaurs sipped. We are connected to this lake that in its ancient form was home to giant beavers, that was known as Skanadario, or sparkling water to Haudenosaunee people.

Read the full homily in this PDF document

Homeless Memorial January 10 noon

Join us next week for the first 2017 memorial. We will gather outside for 20 to 30 minutes and then enjoy a light lunch together inside.

There maybe an opportunity to create quilt squares.

This event and the actual recording of names takes on even more importance in the face of new approaches to counting people without homes.

Read The Globe and Mail article

Go to our main memorial page

National Housing Day of Action Fri, Nov 18

right to housingNational Housing Day of Action

Food, water and shelter are some of the most fundamental human rights, yet Canada is facing an affordable housing and homelessness crisis. Everything begins with housing – without it, no one can truly live life with dignity.

On Friday November 18th, take the people’s pledge and join our National Housing Day of Action – take to the streets and march for the right to housing!

Gather at Queen’s Park at Noon and end the march at the Homeless Memorial outside Church of the Holy Trinity.  Details of the march here.

We encourage you to bring noise makers – pots, pants, cans, shakers, drums, etc. and join the drummers as we march!

To endorse the march as a group or organization, please contact: righttohousingcoalition@gmail.com
(Endorsers will be listed at http://www.acto.ca/peoplespledge)

The Canadian government has promised to fix the affordable housing crisis with Canada’s first ever National Housing Strategy. On November 22nd, they will announce what they have heard people across Canada say is needed in a National Housing Strategy. We are calling for the government to ensure our National Housing Strategy will guarantee everyone the right to safe, adequate, and affordable housing.

We are here, loud and clear. Our message to the government is simple:

“This is Canada’s moment to make history. The federal and provincial governments have made the commitment to provide adequate housing to all. We, the people, are here to make a pledge that we will hold the government accountable to their promise.

  • No one shall ever feel a loss of their dignity because they don’t have a home.
  • No one shall ever have to choose between adequate food and housing.
  • No one shall ever have to live on our streets and sidewalks, or worry they may end up there.
  • No one shall ever have to pass on life’s opportunities because they don’t have a place to call home.

This is our pledge to everyone in Canada. Join our movement. Make your voice heard. Together let’s make a commitment that we will hold the government accountable.”

Tomorrow! Homeless Memorial Tuesday, September 13 at noon

We meet monthly to remember all 833 people whose names are recorded here and the countless others who have been forgotten by some.

The June memorial marked the adding the 831 name to the Homeless Memorial which is not a milestone to be proud of, but one that was marked none-the-less. The Toronto Star wrote an article on this event that quietly took place outside the church on the second Tuesday of July.

Read the article here

We spoke out against police violence that led to “John Doe’s” death, observed our moment of silence for him and all those who have died. We heard Bonnie’s poem and shared announcements of actions we could take to change the system so that no more deaths will occur.

let's talk housing

 

Make your voice heard on a new national housing strategy by visiting the Federal Government input page Let’s Talk Housing.