Tag Archives: Social Justice

The Annual Holy Trinity Book Sale!

Please note: This event continues on Monday, June 25th and Tuesday, June 26th!

Every year in June, under the leafy canopy of Trinity Square, people from all walks of life can be found perusing the books spread out by Holy Trinity’s Refugee Committee. This annual sale is a beloved tradition in the neighbourhood. It benefits the Refugee Committee here at Holy Trinity, who have worked hard to help settle refugees in Toronto for decades, and are still going strong.  This year’s sale takes place on Thursday June 21 and Friday June 22, starting at 9 am and ending at 5 pm each day. Come find a treasure for your coffee table, a fun beach read, or a birthday present!  If you would like to volunteer to set up or tear down the sale, please contact Kate Werneburg at kwerneburg@holytrinitytoronto.org by Friday, June 15th at 5 pm.

Continue reading The Annual Holy Trinity Book Sale!

“May we be courageous today. May we learn today. May we love today.”

 June 10, 2018 – Church of Holy Trinity, Trinity Square

Our sisters and brothers at the Corrymeela Community, Northern Ireland’s longest-serving centre for peace and reconciliation, begin their day with these words:

“We resolve to live life in its fullness:

We will welcome the people who’ll be part of this day.

We will greet God in ordinary and hidden moments.”

What a remarkable story from the Book of Samuel. The elders of Israel complain to Samuel about the judges who were the government of the day. Israel was a group of scattered tribes under attack by the Philistines. The elders wanted a strong man for protection.

Continue reading “May we be courageous today. May we learn today. May we love today.”

Calling All Early Birds: Sunday Breakfast Hosting

SUNDAY BREAKFAST HOSTING

Early bird volunteers are being called to join the roster of Sunday breakfast hosts at Church of the Holy Trinity. This drop-in with light food is open to all. Many people who are homeless or street-involved attend regularly, often those who must leave shelters early in the morning. Aside from being a place to eat, it is a space that provides friendly listening, quiet time, and a place to be early on Sundays. Continue reading Calling All Early Birds: Sunday Breakfast Hosting

help make emergency shelter space

faith leaders hold placards representing homeless deaths.
The Interfaith Coalition to Fight Homelessness is demanding that the city declare an emergency and open 400 more shelter beds. ‘It’s up to you, Mayor Tory. Stop. These. Homeless. Deaths. Now,’ said Rafi Aaron, as he stood at the podium. (John Rieti/CBC)
CBC: Toronto faith leaders urge city to call shelter emergency, open 400 beds

Toronto’s homeless shelter situation is dire. The shelters are full, many people, especially women and families cannot even get a shelter bed. So far any actions taken by the City have failed to meet the basic need of shelter.

After many deputations at the November Community Development and Recreation Committee by community members, front line agencies, advocates, union locals and faith organizations – the Committee voted to support several motions calling on the mayor to declare the situation in the shelter system an emergency and to open 1,000 shelter beds to alleviate the Continue reading help make emergency shelter space

What do we do with the King of Kings?

Keith Nunn, Nov 26, 2017.
In case the lectionary readings today didn’t tip you off, this Sunday is called the Reign of Christ. This is the last stop before we start the cycle over with Mary’s story and the infant Jesus.

Co-incidentally, the first sermon I delivered after entering theological education was on the reign of Christ. At that time, I felt a need and pressure to justify my position through scripture. Not so much anymore. However, I do feel a need to maintain the conversation with scripture in general and with the person of Jesus Christ in particular.

Today, in spite of my infamous reputation for jettisoning the lectionary, I have kept all the appointed readings, albeit in abridged form. The straightforward interpretation of these texts probably makes most of us somewhat uncomfortable—I know it does me. I’ll return to them shortly, however. Continue reading What do we do with the King of Kings?