Tag Archives: Truth and Reconciliation

Sour Grapes

By James Harbeck

Sermon, Holy Trinity, October 1, 2017

Readings: Ezekiel 18:1–4, 25–32; Psalm 25:1–10; Philippians 2:1–13; Matthew 21: 23–32

I’m going to tell a little story today. I don’t know whether I’d call it a parable. It’s not quite a literal history. But it’s close enough.

There was, once, a place that was very nice. Lush. Great for growing grapes and things like that. There was a family living there, and they were pretty happy with it. We’ll call them the Ones. Nothing’s perfect, but, you know, the Ones had food, family, all the things that people do with their time when nothing and no one is forcing them to do something else. Life was good enough.

And then another family showed up from another place. We’ll call them the Twos. They liked where the Ones were living. They wanted to live there. They didn’t say, “Hey, do you mind if we fit in here somehow?” or “What can we give you in exchange for some of what you have so we can live here?” They said, “Hi. We’re the Twos. These are guns. Look what they can do: [BANG BANG BANG]. Get the idea? We want this land. Oh, you? You can get out and live somewhere else, or you can stay and work for us.” Some of the Ones left. Some were killed. Some decided to stay and work for the Twos, because at least they’d still be in this nice place getting the benefit of the land. Continue reading Sour Grapes

Walking With Our Sisters

Walking With Our Sisters
Website: www.walkingwithoursisters.ca
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/WWOSTO/
Twitter @wwos1 #wwos
Instagram: wwos_to

This October in Toronto, there is a very special opportunity to honour and remember the more than a thousand, Indigenous women, girls and Two Spirit people who have been murdered or remain missing. Walking With Our Sisters is a commemorative art installation hosted at the Aboriginal Education Centre, at 16 Phin Avenue, near Donlands and Danforth, from the 15th to the 22th of October.

Walking With Our Sisters is a national community based commemorative project of nearly 2,000 “vamps” — the tops of moccasins that have been intentionally left unfinished signifying the loss of unfinished lives. More than an art exhibit, this ceremony invites you on a journey to remember the losses, to honour grieving families and to work for change. Continue reading Walking With Our Sisters

Celebrating Canada’s Long History

July 2, 10:30 am. We gather with each other and with Treaty Canoe. We will sing together, hear readings from Ryan McMahon, Christi Belcourt and the Gospel. We will reflect on our country, history and ourselves and respond as we are called and able. We will share the gifts of the land and of human hands. Please join us. Continue reading Celebrating Canada’s Long History

Canada By Treaty: Histories of a Negotiated Place

April 28 – May 25, Hart House Map Room Exhibit 

The exhibit explores treaties, those legal agreements with Indigenous peoples that allowed non-Indigenous people to live on and own land in what is now Canada. The four-week exhibit responds to the 150th anniversary of Confederation by explaining in accessible language the long history of treaty making, and how and why these agreements were essential to the foundation of modern Canada. Co-curated by fourth year undergraduate James Bird, Nehiyawak (Cree), Indigenous Studies and Architecture, and Department of History Professors Laurie Bertram and Heidi Bohaker, the exhibit draws on content created by students in Professor Bohaker’s Fall 2016 joint fourth year/graduate seminar “Canada By Treaty.”

More information at UofT website

Canada and First Nations – Our Shared History – Aug 11

blanket exercise feetBefore there can be reconciliation, there must be truth. The Treaty People group is hosting a pair of Kairos Blanket Exercises on August 11. One at noon and again at 5:30pm.

The Blanket Exercise is a visceral way to hear and enter into the history of indigenous peoples and settlers in North America. It provides a starting point for doing the work the Truth and Reconciliation Commission has asked of all Canadians.

This event is aimed at all citizens and residents of Canada and those curious about the history of Canada with respect to indigenous peoples. We invite you to join us for the Kairos Blanket Exercise at noon (or 5:30pm), to be followed by an age appropriate circle and discussion. If you can’t spare more than an hour, the exercise is still worthwhile, but be aware that it is profoundly affecting and we encourage you to stay for the second hour to build relationships.

We will serve a light meal of soup and bread.

See www.kairosblanketexercise.org to get a better understanding of this experiential workshop.

Let us know you are coming by visiting our Facebook events: KBE at noon, KBE at 5:30pm.

Please feel free to print and hang our Kairos Blanket Exercise poster.

treatypeople

Follow-up document: “What can I do?”

Intergenerational Blanket Exercise 2 PM Sunday, February 21

blanket exercise feetThe Treaty People group at Holy Trinity is hosting an Intergenerational Blanket Exercise on February 21 at 2pm using the KAIROS process.

The Blanket Exercise is a visceral way to hear and enter into the history of indigenous peoples and settlers in North America. It provides a starting point for doing the work the Truth and Reconciliation Commission has asked of all Canadians.

This event is aimed at people of all ages in faith communities in downtown Toronto. We invite you to join us for the Blanket Exercise at 2pm, to be followed by an age appropriate circle and discussion.
We will screen a topical film at 1pm for those who find it easier to arrive earlier.

See www.kairosblanketexercise.org to get a better understanding of this experiential workshop.

Let us know you are coming by visiting our Facebook Event.

Please feel free to print and hang our
Blanket Exercise Poster

a long walk to freedom

On February 21 at 10:30am we will reprise a powerful theme from last year: “Freedom”. We’ve been digging the roots of african-american spirituals. We were particularly moved by an interview and song sharing with Joe Carter you can listen to here. I would encourage you to listen, whether you are going to attend this service or not. It is very powerful.

a long walk to freedom

The spirituals were not just songs about god, they carried hopes for literal freedom, secret resistance and, unimpressed with the religion of the masters, a claiming of the person of Jesus for themselves and as a way to reconnect with the high god they had been separated from by the ocean. While some of the language, particularly the word Lord, can be hard for some of us who consider ourselves modern and progressive, entering into the world of the composers and singers of this music was powerful for us and we hope to capture some of that power in our service this month and share it with the whole community.

The music will be mostly traditional spirituals, but we will be using a few more recent songs as well

Feast – reflecting on community and intimacy

Our liturgy this morning was on the theme of feast. I am including the reflection I shared, in both text and video forms as well as the bulletin which has most of the service text. There are a few bits missing from the bulletin, but the most exciting bit was that the Fallen Angles played “Changes” by David Bowie as a Postlude and tribute. Thanks to everyone who sang and danced along. Continue reading Feast – reflecting on community and intimacy

TRC Findings #Readthereport

TRC_logo_eng
It’s critical that this work does not sit on the shelf.  Read these reports on your own, out loud in groups, in church, in meetings. Talk about them with your family, your neighbours, your co-workers.

Reconciliation Actions you can take

heart garden creation 1

Lots was said and done when we received the Truth and Reconciliation Commission Report in early June. Our heart garden and an Anglican Church timeline poster continue to occupy space in our church over the summer. Some community actions will be planned for the fall.

What can you do to continue your own journey of reconciliation? Read the report and particularly the call to actions that is linked above. Take yourself to events that are hosted by Aboriginal communities. This weekend, August 1 & 2 Diane and Douglas Allen (Holy Trinity members afar) will be volunteering at the Wasauksing First Nation Powwow, on the Wasauksing
traditional grounds, Depot Harbour. Grand entry at noon both days. Details can be found here. Other upcoming Pow Wows in Ontario are listed here.

You might choose to learn more with some Indigenous summer reading recommended by CBC Next Chapter host Shelagh Rogers, CBC New Fire host, Lisa Charleyboy, and graphic novelist David Robertson

There are a couple of upcoming festivals highlighting art and culture from a variety of Aboriginal nations. Beginning this weekend Planet IndigenUS  4  gives prominence to the voices, stories and cultures of Indigenous people that are largely absent from the Canadian narrative and will be hosted at Harbourfront Centre and other locations until August 9th. ImagineNative Film & Media Arts Festival will take place in the fall, October 14 to 18, but will also be screening films at Harbourfront Centre over the next two weeks.

Aboriginal Art exhibits:

Now to August 31 Aboriginal Arts & Stories: Youth art exhibit at Parliament Street library. Laying the groundwork for cultural reconciliation and community healing, these young First Nations, Métis, and Inuit artists have presented interpretive pieces on Aboriginal culture and heritage through literary and visual arts for a chance to earn national recognition.

August Truth and Reconciliation: Special Exhibit on the legacy of residential schools at St. James Cathedral, 65 Church Street at King

Continue to walk on the path of reconciliation through these and other activities. Let us know what you do bbaskin@holytrinitytoronto.org