An Evening with the Marion Singers January 28

Come join us for a night of music and drinks in support of a great cause!

refugee-committee

 

 

 

 

 

We will open the doors of Church of the Holy Trinity, 19 Trinity Square, Toronto at 7 pm

Price: Adult:$20
Student:$15

Drinks available for purchase throughout the evening

Purchase tickets online  Print our Marion-singers-poster

For more information on the Church and its Refugee Committee, check us out online.

Have any questions? Feel free to email us at:
holytrinityrefugee@gmail.com

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By then end of 2015, The United Nations Refugee Agency reported 65.3 million people were displaced from their homes. This means every 60 seconds, 24 people were forced to flee due to conflict or persecution.

The Refugee Committee at the Church of the Holy Trinity has actively been sponsoring refugees since 1991. Our congregation has sponsored over 100 refugees fleeing persecution and violence in countries such as Afghanistan, Burundi, Cambodia, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Iran and Iraq. We provide refugee newcomers with financial and moral support; today, they are making positive contributions to our society, both economically and socially. We know we are called to welcome the stranger. Our sponsorship efforts are one of the ways we seek to answer that call.

The Marion Singers have been donating their talents for the benefit of humanitarian causes and non-profit organizations in monthly concerts throughout the GTA for 20 years.
The Choir is a 16-voice ensemble whose concerts include a mixed repertoire of music styles including classic sacred pieces from composers such as Mendelssohn, Viadanna, and Tallis, as well as modern composers including Tavener, Lauridsen and Busto. They perform a wide range of fun secular music as well from a repertoire that includes old Canadiana, folk music from the British Isles and songs by Billy Joel and the Beatles. The intimate atmosphere they create in concert with close harmonies, always sung a capella (without instruments), is a treat for every music-lover.

Church Youth Coordinator

we're hiring

Church Youth Coordinator
The Church of the Holy Trinity is a progressive, social justice oriented Anglican Church located right next to the Eaton Centre. The parish is looking for a Youth Coordinator to work with its small but energetic group of young people.

Responsibilities:
Create an activity-based curriculum for engaging the existing youth, and developing it into a youth-centred program that will attract other “tweens” and teens to join in.
Facilitate meetings during the church service time, and after church (1-2 hours) during some Sundays. On the Sundays of “intergenerational services” preparing (as full as possible) participation of the youth; building towards longer once a month youth programming, possibly on Saturday afternoons.
Consult with parents and members of the Worship Committee to develop the program, focusing on the ideas of the youth themselves
Focus on engaging and meeting the youth “where they’re at” while supporting them to make connections to faith and spirituality, as they understand it, as well as to the life of the church community. This would entail being less focused on content, and more on engagement and facilitation.
Meet regularly with parents and interested parishioners, and be open to spontaneous consultations with parents. Supervision provided by parish priest.
Be accountable for the youth program’s budget and materials

Qualifications:
Capacity to reflect theologically, yet relating to youth who don’t necessarily speak or think theologically
Faith based commitment to social justice
Experience working with youth
The Youth Coordinator is a part time (4 hours/week) position from January 1-June 30, 2017 with the possibility of renewal the following school year, September 2017—June 30, 2018. Compensation is $20.00/hour.

Anglican Diocese of Toronto policy and Provincial law requires a Vulnerable Persons Criminal Records check before we can confirm an appointment to this position.

Interested applicants please submit a cover letter and resume to: ht@holytrinitytoronto by November 30, 2016 or addressed to the Rev. Sherman Hesselgrave; 10 Trinity Square, Toronto, ON M5G 1B1.

December 3, A Dresden Christmas with the Cantemus Singers

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December 3 & 4: In Dulci Jubilo A Dresden Christmas, featuring 17th century motets and carols by Hassler, Praetorius, Schütz and Bach

Saturday, Dec. 3 at 7:30 pm at the Church of the Holy Trinity, Eaton Centre

 

 

Sunday, Dec. 4 at 3:00 pm at St. Aidan’s Anglican Church, Silver Birch at Queen St. E. in the Beaches

Tickets: $20 General Admission; Kids under 12 free

Available at the door (cash only), or reserve for pick-up by calling 416 578-6602. For more information cantemus.ca@gmail.com or their website.

 

National Housing Day of Action Fri, Nov 18

right to housingNational Housing Day of Action

Food, water and shelter are some of the most fundamental human rights, yet Canada is facing an affordable housing and homelessness crisis. Everything begins with housing – without it, no one can truly live life with dignity.

On Friday November 18th, take the people’s pledge and join our National Housing Day of Action – take to the streets and march for the right to housing!

Gather at Queen’s Park at Noon and end the march at the Homeless Memorial outside Church of the Holy Trinity.  Details of the march here.

We encourage you to bring noise makers – pots, pants, cans, shakers, drums, etc. and join the drummers as we march!

To endorse the march as a group or organization, please contact: righttohousingcoalition@gmail.com
(Endorsers will be listed at http://www.acto.ca/peoplespledge)

The Canadian government has promised to fix the affordable housing crisis with Canada’s first ever National Housing Strategy. On November 22nd, they will announce what they have heard people across Canada say is needed in a National Housing Strategy. We are calling for the government to ensure our National Housing Strategy will guarantee everyone the right to safe, adequate, and affordable housing.

We are here, loud and clear. Our message to the government is simple:

“This is Canada’s moment to make history. The federal and provincial governments have made the commitment to provide adequate housing to all. We, the people, are here to make a pledge that we will hold the government accountable to their promise.

  • No one shall ever feel a loss of their dignity because they don’t have a home.
  • No one shall ever have to choose between adequate food and housing.
  • No one shall ever have to live on our streets and sidewalks, or worry they may end up there.
  • No one shall ever have to pass on life’s opportunities because they don’t have a place to call home.

This is our pledge to everyone in Canada. Join our movement. Make your voice heard. Together let’s make a commitment that we will hold the government accountable.”

“Gently to Nagasaki— The Toronto Book Launch” Thursday, Nov 10 7:30 PM

Thursday, November 10 7:30 PM “Gently to Nagasaki— The Toronto Book Launch” at The Church of Holy Trinity (19 Trinity Sq, Toronto, ON, M5G 1B1). Free admission and open to the public. Books available for sale by Ben McNally Books. No RSVP required.
Joy Kogawa will be joined on stage by Mary Jo Leddy, CM. Both authors will speak to their deep knowledge of forgiveness, assuredness, and trust in the context of today’s desires of repairing personal and cultural relationships. Both events are truly accessible masterclasses on self-healing and sincerity. More info available

Another related event is taking place on Friday, October 28 at 4 PM “A Dream of Reconciliation,” a conversation between Joy Kogawa, Bishop Patrick Yu, and Olivia Chow. Hosted by Caitlin Press and The Cheng Yu Tung East Asian Library at the Cheng Yu Tung East Asian Library (8th floor, Robarts Library, 130 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A5).
Admission is free. Light refreshments provided. All are welcome. Books will be available for sale by Nikkei Books. The author will be available for signing. Reserve your seat

Why are you doing this? (James Harbeck’s homily for Oct. 23rd)

Readings: Sirach 35:12–17, Psalm 84:1–7, 2 Timothy 4:6–8, 16–18, Luke 18:9–14

We don’t clap for homilies.

If you go most places other than a church – in fact, if you go to some churches, too – a person who gives a speech filled with information and insights will get applause at the end: polite at least, and thunderous if the speech is particularly inspirational. But for a homily? That would imply that the homilist was doing it for their own glory. It would acknowledge the signpost instead of the destination, the spotlight instead of the soloist. This is about god. Or for those principles that we hold in highest esteeem.

And anyway, no one likes someone who is too proud, too obviously pious. In matters spiritual we are to transcend ourselves. We want to do a good job, of course, and there is nothing wrong with feeling satisfied that we have done a good job, but the moment we place ourselves above others we’ve undone, at least within ourselves, what we were setting out to do.

Now, the truth is that we almost never do anything for just one reason. The more valuable ends we can accomplish at the same time, the better. Cook a nice meal and you provide nutrition as well as enjoyment and you get a sense of satisfaction – and you may also show off how much you can afford (or, conversely, how frugal you are), and maybe finally find a use for that jar of pickled lemons you bought a while ago, and solidify your relationship with whoever you cooked for, and…

Even just having a conversation with a friend, you’re not just exchanging information; you’re solidifying and constantly negotiating a relationship, with its attendant statuses and likes and dislikes, and you’re finding out about things that entertain you or that may help you play a role with others – now you are the receiver of information, perhaps what you learn will help you be the wise giver of information with the next person…

There is no “just saying,” after all. You’re always trying to produce some effect. If you say “I’m just saying,” that means you acknowledge that you have no right to expect the other person to act on your wishes… but of course you still want them to. Otherwise you just wouldn’t say it.

So we can see clearly enough that people who exalt themselves and emphasize their sanctity are getting something from it that is more and other than the simple act of worship. Likewise, someone who puts their name all over charitable donations is, in our view, giving the lie to the self-transcendence: they don’t want the fruit of their efforts all to go to the other person, they want some kudos. We tend not to like that. In other cultural contexts it might be seen as setting a good example for others. In ours, it suggests that their interests are at least in part for themselves, which we don’t think of as the right example.

We can sometimes be quite vigorous in calling out hypocrisy and unfairness. When we see people who on the one hand vote to criminalize abortion because they declare that they respect life, but on the other hand vote against funding for social services, so that children once born – and their parents – have much harder lives while those who have more than enough hoard their wealth, we naturally want to point it out. When the “war on drugs” results in no less drug use but a massive pipeline of poor people into prisons to enrich a few, we naturally want to do what we can to fix that. When ad campaigns and sports logos use racist stereotypes, we want to exert what pressure we can to see that fixed.

I’m on Twitter a lot. Twitter is a great place to go if you want to see people calling our wrongdoing. Boy, lemme tell ya, if you want a good argument to fight the good fight, Twitter is the place. Faults are very readily pointed out and immediate correction suggested. And people who are odious are roundly condemned. Even people who are generally on the right path but make use of a stereotype, or thoughtlessly use a casual slur, will get instant correction.

And, boy, it can be great to call someone out. To shut someone down. You’ve struck a blow for justice and fairness. And that adrenaline gets pumping. Doesn’t it feel good?

[meaningful pause]

But does it change the other person’s mind? Is it the most effective way to achieve your ends? Sometimes it is. Being nice only gets you so far. When inequalities are so entrenched that most people think they’re reasonable, the people who disrupt them will seem unreasonable. But sometimes, your reward isn’t changing other people’s minds. It’s just a lively argument that makes you feel good about fighting the good fight. It may alienate someone who was generally on your side, or cause a person on the opposite side to harden their position, but you raised the flaming banner of righteousness! But if you’re not actually changing anything, why are you doing this?

I recently read an excellent article about Derek Black, a young man whose father is a leading white nationalist in the US. Derek grew up to be an important voice in the white nationalist movement, heir apparent to his father’s leadership role, a good friend of David Duke of the KKK. But when he went to college, he went to a fairly liberal college. He kept his white nationalism under his hat so that he wouldn’t be ostracized. But eventually his writings and radio shows were outed to the campus community. Responses were quick and understandable. Many students were very angry with him and had very strong corrective things to say to him, directly or – more often – just through the indirect medium of public denunciation. Derek Black was right, after all: being known as a white nationalist was a sure way to be ostracized.

But some of the students who knew him thought that just ostracizing him wouldn’t produce the best results. One of these was an Orthodox Jewish student who had Shabbat dinners at his apartment every Friday. He always invited a bunch of friends, most of whom weren’t Jewish. He decided to invite Derek Black. Derek Black, who had always been polite to him, but Derek Black, who had written online that Jews were not white and would have to leave the US. Derek came, and he kept coming. Conversations avoided the elephant in the room for a long time and just strengthened the social bonds. Gradually questions were asked. He clarified his views. Then modified them. And as he studied more and more history, he came to find that his views had not been quite well founded. As he came to learn more and to know other students from diverse backgrounds and to understand and respect them, he eventually modified his views so much they… really weren’t white nationalist at all. Finally, in his own time and his own way, he admitted and declared publicly that he wasn’t a white nationalist at all anymore. And that he was sorry for the harm he had done.

White nationalist views – and other similarly harmful lines of thought – have to be opposed. They have to be pointed out. We can’t let people feel that they can hold them comfortably and just get along. But on the other hand, it doesn’t help if we just shout at them and make them dig in while we feel good about ourselves.

Not everybody’s mind is going to change, admittedly. In my younger years I got into a lot of arguments with people who were offensively wrong about things, and I couldn’t understand how they could fail to acknowledge obvious, clearly spelled out facts but would just shift the subject, mischaracterize others’ positions, be abusive. Finally I realized that some people don’t want to actually be right, they just want to be seen as right. To win. They just want to fight and win. When dealing with such people, first make sure you’re not one of them too. And then… cut your losses, walk away, stop trying to convince them, just work to defeat them instead. But, on the other hand, some people who seem like that actually can be engaged. Some immature, abusive, and oblivious people can grow up. Maybe they won’t change their minds right away, but, over time, they very well may. And maybe you’ll learn something too.

But whether we’re working to oppose and undo them, or to welcome them and sway them through openness, we have to keep our eyes on the task at hand. And ask ourselves, why are we doing this? What effect are we trying to produce, and how? If we do something good, of course we’re going to feel good about having done it. But if we’re about to do something that will really only achieve making us feel like we’ve fought the good fight, without actually changing anyone’s mind, well, we get our reward – that feeling of righteousness – but we could have had something better.

Celebrate Sanctuary North’s 15th Anniversary on November 5th

Saturday, November 5 from 5 to 9 PM Celebrate Sanctuary North’s fifteenth anniversary! There will be supper, a bar, music, entertainment and a slide show of Sanctuary North’s fifteen year history here in the church, 19 Trinity Square. This event is hosted by the Sanctuary North Board and related organizations.
Sanctuary North would not exist if it hadn’t been for a sixty thousand dollar grant that the congregation approved from a “windfall” we received just before the turn of the century. A lot of people from Holy Trinity and San Esteban communities have been involved from the outset though Sanctuary North has welcomed refugees from many different communities.
Please speak with Lee or Michael Creal or Ian Sowton to say you are coming so we can plan for realistic numbers. Email mcreal@yorku.ca It will be a great occasion. A Holy Trinity achievement worth celebrating!

Photo: Looking out from the porch of Sanctuary North over the York River. Sanctuary North is located north west of Bancroft, ON.

Elora Festival Singers Concert October 16 3 PM

Toronto Mendelssohn Choir brings the Grammy-nominated Elora Festival Singers to Toronto for an intimate concert of a cappella music by the Italian Renaissance master Palestrina, complemented by contemporary works.

Palestrina: Missa Ut, Re, Mi, Fa, Sol, La
Morlock: Exaudi
Tavener: The Tyger
Tavener: The Lamb
Pärt: The Woman with the Alabaster Box
Pärt: The Deer’s Cry
Bach: Lobet den Herrn (Motet 6)

Read more and listen here

loving justice in the heart of the city