Reflections from the Wednesday Noon Eucharist (27 April 2016}

Today we remembered St Mark the Evangelist, whose Feast day falls on March 25th. At this weekly service, instead of a homily, we spend a few minutes reflecting as a group on the appointed readings or on the saint being commemorated, or on what God is doing in the world or in our lives.

The blurb about the saint of the day in For All the Saints, notes that Mark “was addressing a Church confused by the gap between the promise of “the good news” and the reality of persecution.”

This reminded me of a review I read   in the latest New Yorker of a new book about the poet Wallace Stevens. The reviewer (Peter Schjeldahl) mentions his candidate for the finest American modern poem: “The Idea of order at Key West.” I pulled out my anthology of 20th-century poetry and read Stevens’ poem, finding it a challenging piece of work. The phrase “blessed rage for order” comes from this poem, although it was more familiar to me as the title of David Tracy’s book about theological pluralism. I looked up an analysis of poem and found this: “The core of the poem lies on the interdependence of imagination and reality. Stevens stresses the “essential discontinuity between them” and emphasizes their differences by “demonstrating the vain struggle of the imagination ‘to grasp what it beholds in a single version of it.”

Another member of our Wednesday circle mentioned having seen a PBS special on Buddhism recently, in which a Buddhist monk spoke of people being surprised that Buddhist monks continually struggle with earthly temptations on their spiritual path. The struggle between the illusory and pursuit of Nirvana is ever present.

Whatever the spiritual path we walk, there will always be distractions, washouts, potholes, detours, forks, dead-ends, and the unknown. We have always had to live with these tensions as part of the journey.

— Sherman Hesselgrave

A long night of work…

Peter Haresnape’s Homily for Easter 3

After the torchlight red on sweaty faces
After the frosty silence in the gardens
After the agony in stony places
The shouting and the crying
Prison and palace and reverberation
Of thunder of spring over distant mountains
He who was now living is now dead
We who were living are now dying
With a little patience

[— T. S. Eliot, “The Wasteland“]

After the busyness and disruption of Easter, we get back to work, the children go back to school, and Simon Peter gets together with his friends and goes fishing.

A long night of work, and nothing to show for it, but then, through the sudden provision of great abundance, they recognise the Lord in the mysterious, almost unrecognizable form waiting by the shore. Continue reading A long night of work…

Panter’s Pub feat. Sue & Dwight

https://www.facebook.com/events/1736078119972882/

The 12th edition of the pub party in the old chapel at Holy Trinity is coming soon. This time our featured artists will be Sue & Dwight. For the past 10 years, the singer/songwriter duo ‘Sue and Dwight’ has been a steady fixture on the Toronto Music Scene performing in clubs, house concerts and festivals. They will share their stories of the prairies, life in the big city, and travels in East Africa–perfect for the warm and intimate atmosphere of Panter’s Pub. http://www.sueanddwight.com/

PP is a semi-private party upstairs in the old chapel at Holy Trinity, 19 Trinity Square, Toronto where Local singer-songwriters, poets and radicals gather to have a good time and maybe plot the revolution.

Keith Nunn and friends will open at 8pm,
Featured artist at 9,
Dancing at 10.
Entrance by donation,
BYOB (We have wine, beer and seasonal sangria if you just want to show up).

There are many stairs, I’m sorry. I am hoping to have some ground floor events soon.
RSVP appreciated, but not necessary.

“Water is the blood that flows through this wounded body”

A reflection on Water For Ecumenical Good Friday,
Church of the Holy Trinity, March 25 2016

Who lives the pain of Good Friday in our time? Communities of Pimicikamak /Cross Lake, Syria, South Sudan, Kashechewan…

Where do we hear the cries? Taste the thirst for justice? Refugees fleeing, women sexually assaulted, black lives ignored, Indigenous girls missing…

Where do we see the wounds? Melting permafrost, fracked earth, tailings ponds, tanker spills… Continue reading “Water is the blood that flows through this wounded body”

“I thirst…” Ecumenical Good Friday Walk

2016 TORONTO GOOD FRIDAY WALK TO FOCUS ON WATER

Jesus’ cry from the cross, “I am thirsty,” is the impetus for this year’s Ecumenical Good Friday Walk for Justice in downtown Toronto.

On the traditional territory of the Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation, we will walk in the Lake Ontario Waterfront watershed, starting on the shore of Lake Ontario at Harbour Square Park, just west of the ferry docks at the foot of Bay Street.  Participants will gather at 2 p.m., then proceed north on Bay Street, stopping at ‘stations’ along the way to decry the unjust use of the divine gift of water leading to environmental degradation and vast numbers of refugees.

The Walk will end at the Church of the Holy Trinity (just west of the Eaton Centre) for a brief worship service and message from Jennifer Henry, Executive Director of Kairos. “The health of water is about the health of our communities — not only the quality of our relations with the earth community within watersheds, but also the nature of relationships with Indigenous peoples as the original custodians of water,” Henry says.

A simple supper will take place there at approximately 4:00 p.m. A freewill offering will support the efforts of participating social justice organizations.

As Jesus cried out in thirst from the Cross, we too thirst for justice – for the environment and for all creatures adversely affected by systems that misuse or destroy Earth, our sacred home.

History of the walk and past walk pictures on their website.

Holy Week at Holy Trinity

You are invited to join us for the whole Easter Story or just what speaks to your soul.

Services:

  • Sunday, March 20 10:30 AM Palm Sunday Service with the procession of Palms – separate program for youth and children
  • Thursday,  March 24 6:00 PM Maundy Thursday with service, supper that involves youth, children, and the San Esteban (Spanish speaking) community. A family sleepover follows
  • Friday, March 25 10:30 AM Solemn Good Friday Liturgy with Choral Music.  Program provided for young people.
  • Friday, March 25 2:00 PM Ecumenical Good Friday Walk for Justice theme this year is “I thirst…” This year the walk will begin at Lake Ontario and proceed up Bay Street to Holy Trinity.  Details on the EGFW  website
  • Saturday, March 26 8:00 PM The Great Vigil of Easter This service includes Biblical readings, the lighting of the Paschal Fire and a service of light, remembering our baptismal vows, and the First Eucharist of Easter. Young people and families are active in the leadership of the service.
  • Sunday, March 27 10:30 AM Easter Eucharist with an all ages present. We will flower the cross and share the Eucharist followed by a celebratory lunch and Easter Egg Hunt. We will use both English and Spanish in this service.

Steinway Piano Fundraiser – Thursday, April 7 7:30 PM

A fundraising concert for the church’s new Steinway “B” Concert Grand Piano

featuring William Aide, piano

William Aide photo

 

 

 

 

 

and Robert Aitken, flute,

Robert Aitken with flute March 1, 2015 (Photo credit Daniel Foley)

performing Romantic repertoire together again for the first time in decades; works by Burton, Schubert/Boehm, Linton-France, Chopin, Debussy, and Meyer-Obersleben.

 

General admission $25 at the door, or contact (416) 598-4521 ext. 301 or email: musicmondayscs@gmail.com 

All funds raised will go towards installation and ongoing maintenance.

Join us in Church of the Holy Trinity, 19 Trinity Square beside the Toronto Eaton Centre  to hear this beautiful instrument come to life!

Steinway Piano Fundraising Concert

 

Canada’s record on housing criticized by UN committee

A group of community leaders and housing activists presented the latest UN report on Canada’s failure to address urgent housing needs at the finance minister’s constituency office yesterday.

“For some time, Canada’s international reputation has been in serious decline and we’ve really gone from being a beacon of human rights globally to a country whose reputation is very much in question,” said University of Toronto senior researcher Emily Paradis, who presented Canada’s record on housing to the UN committee in 2006. “I would certainly hope that this review offers an opportunity for Canada to redeem itself if our new government is serious about its international human rights obligations.”

Panter’s Pub 11: A Reconciling Heart, feat. Kim Cole

PP_springThe 11th edition of the pub party in the old chapel at Holy Trinity is fast approaching. This Saturday night our featured artist will be Kim Cole. A fixture on the Toronto busker scene, Kim is a great singer/songwriter who has released two excellent albums to date. I’ve been a fan of hers for a couple of years and am really excited to have her join us this month. She keeps a low profile online, but you can catch a flavour in this snippet from the subway a couple years ago: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=djgMw9Kxx6U

Facebook event page
Continue reading Panter’s Pub 11: A Reconciling Heart, feat. Kim Cole

loving justice in the heart of the city