All posts by Keith Nunn

Many Waters

Here are a few excerpts from our recent Sunday gathering: Many Waters.

Come, launch the light canoe;
The breeze is fresh and strong:

The summer skies are blue,
And ’tis joy to float along;
Away o’er the waters.
The bright-glancing waters,
The many-voiced waters.
As they dance in light and song.

Susanna Moodie

Today we have gathered and we see that the cycles of life continue.
We have been given the duty to live in balance and harmony
with each other and all living things.
So now, we bring our minds together as one as we give greetings and thanks to each other as people.

(Excerpt from Haudenosaunee Thanksgiving Address, Greetings to the Natural World)

Lace your boots,
pick up your paddle,
mount your bike and go out
blessing each other—
strong, brave, laughing
and making hope wherever you may.
Amen.

Many Waters Bulletin – final

Canada and First Nations – Our Shared History – Aug 11

blanket exercise feetBefore there can be reconciliation, there must be truth. The Treaty People group is hosting a pair of Kairos Blanket Exercises on August 11. One at noon and again at 5:30pm.

The Blanket Exercise is a visceral way to hear and enter into the history of indigenous peoples and settlers in North America. It provides a starting point for doing the work the Truth and Reconciliation Commission has asked of all Canadians.

This event is aimed at all citizens and residents of Canada and those curious about the history of Canada with respect to indigenous peoples. We invite you to join us for the Kairos Blanket Exercise at noon (or 5:30pm), to be followed by an age appropriate circle and discussion. If you can’t spare more than an hour, the exercise is still worthwhile, but be aware that it is profoundly affecting and we encourage you to stay for the second hour to build relationships.

We will serve a light meal of soup and bread.

See www.kairosblanketexercise.org to get a better understanding of this experiential workshop.

Let us know you are coming by visiting our Facebook events: KBE at noon, KBE at 5:30pm.

Please feel free to print and hang our Kairos Blanket Exercise poster.

treatypeople

Follow-up document: “What can I do?”

Pride Sunday with MPP Cheri DiNovo – June 26

rainbow-stripOur guest homilist on Pride Sunday at HT (June 26) will be MPP Cheri DiNovo, long-time activist for LGBTQ rights and an ordained United Church minister. Named by NOW readers in 2015 as Best MPP.

From her official bio:

Cheri has been a 40+ year activist for LGBTQ issues. She was the only woman in Canada to sign the ‘We Demand’ statement in 1971—the first demand for gay rights on Parliament Hill. In 2012, Cheri succeeded in getting Toby’s Act passed, an amendment to the Ontario Human Rights Code to include gender identity and gender expression–the first of its kind in North America.

Continue reading Pride Sunday with MPP Cheri DiNovo – June 26

Feast – reflecting on community and intimacy

Our liturgy this morning was on the theme of feast. I am including the reflection I shared, in both text and video forms as well as the bulletin which has most of the service text. There are a few bits missing from the bulletin, but the most exciting bit was that the Fallen Angles played “Changes” by David Bowie as a Postlude and tribute. Thanks to everyone who sang and danced along. Continue reading Feast – reflecting on community and intimacy

Mary’s Song

MarysSong

This service is on opportunity to delve into Mary’s song musically, emotionally, and physically. The worship leadership will be moving from place to place and we invite you to participate in as many ways as you feel comfortable. We recognize that this does not fit our familiar pattern, but hope the richness of words, images, and actions will offer much to your spiritual experience this morning.

The service will be in 4 movements:

  1. Relationship (Family/community/gathering). Who do you run to? Who do you talk to?
  2. Revolution/Re-creation (Justice). “The arc of the universe bends toward justice.”
  3. Redress/Reconciliation (Jubilee). What is a good thing?
  4. Response (Action). How do we respond? What are we to do?

Continue reading Mary’s Song

Disrupting Empire – Jesus’ entry into Jerusalem as political theatre

Palm Sunday, March 29, 2015

texts: Paolo Freire, Pedagogy of the Oppressed; Zechariah 9:9-10; Mark 11:1-11

As Canadians and Christians we feel a lot of social pressure to be nice. To not cause trouble. Especially for folks who seem nice. Nobody should be distressed. Let’s keep everything, on the surface anyway, agreeable and pleasant. Well that’s nice isn’t it? Sometimes it’s even a good thing. But sometimes what is required is real honesty. Whether that’s telling our true feelings to a friend who needs to know, or speaking a difficult truth to those in power. Or even challenging our own assumptions.

However, that desire to smooth things over can be overwhelming at times. We may choose silence or couched words over challenging conversation. Or we may avoid someone or something altogether rather than offering a challenge and engagement that might spark personal growth or a healed relationship. Continue reading Disrupting Empire – Jesus’ entry into Jerusalem as political theatre

Like Watchers for the Morning: Temptation

Tay Moss, incumbent at Church of the Messiah, is producing a Lenten reflection series for the Anglican Church of Canada. As a visual backdrop, he is filming churches at night. Quite a fascinating process. I worked with Tay to film Holy Trinity as the setting for the second installment. I had no idea at the time what the text would be. In watching this today, I found his take on temptation quite interesting. You can watch below or follow the whole series at the national web site.

‘Our work, as Christians in Canada today, is dissent’

I stumbled across a great article online. I think it puts the struggle to be faithful today in a helpful light:

Our job is to offer the wisdom of scripture: “Seek justice, love kindness, walk humbly with God.” …

Admittedly, it is a very wide mandate. So much justice-seeking to be done – justice for the land, suffering from runaway oil and gas exploitation and factory farms that are anything but kind. Justice in the face of agri-business that seeks a quick profit, not the long, slow, humble walking with the seasons and the soil that sustains it for our grandchildren. Justice for workers, suffering from anti-union legislation and secret trade deals that disempower them. Justice-seeking as new security legislation threatens to turn CSIS into a secret force, policing those whose legitimate protests – against a pipeline, say – might be construed as “interference with critical infrastructure.”

Read the whole article at EssentialSpirituality.com.

Tireless campaigner for housing reform is surprised to turn 60

Michael_Shapcott-7644-446x670Michael Shapcott started his working life as a journalist in a number of places including the North Bay Nugget and the Calgary Herald, but he is best known for his work and writing on housing issues.

His public involvement in housing issues began in the late 1980s when he graduated from law school. He was one of the founding members of the Bread Not Circuses coalition which worked to convince people and politicians that the money being spent on Toronto’s 1996 Olympic bid would be better spent on housing. The organizers felt it hurt the bid, so it was probably pretty successful.

He worked for a number of housing agencies and helped found the National Housing and Homelessness Network, the Toronto Disaster Relief Committee, the Multi-Faith Alliance to End Homelessness and the Toronto Environmental Alliance. His anger at the events which led to the Rupert Hotel fire in 1989 led to founding a coalition which pressed for and got better regulation and enforcement of safety standards in rooming houses.

Until recently he continued his work in housing as the Director of the Affordable Housing and Social Innovation at the Wellesley Institute. His public policy research focused on housing, homelessness, and the relationships between health, poverty and housing.  He is currently seconded to the Prince of Wales to support his work in Canada through The Prince’s Charities.

Like a number of our members, Michael has dabbled in electoral politics, coming in second in the riding of Toronto Centre in the 2004 and 2006 federal elections.

Michael has been very involved in the life of Holy Trinity for many years in many important capacities. He currently serves as a warden helping ensure the viability of the parish as a whole. He has just started studying theology in his limited spare time.

His secret lomshapcott_accordionve though, is the accordion. While recovering from meningitis that left him in a coma for a time, he was hiking through Frontenac Provincial Park with a friend. The lingering deafness of his illness meant he thought he was going a little mad when he heard an accordion playing in the distance. He heard just fine however and the two of them walked to a little cabin from which the sound was emerging.

As they entered, they could see that the small room was filled with accordions of all types and sizes. They stayed and listened for a time and chatted with the player. Michael confessed that he had always loved the accordion. The player gave Michael an accordion after extracting from him a promise that he would never keep it in a case because “an accordion needs to breathe.”

Michael played that accordion for years and has it still. However, his beloved wife Ann Bisch offered an ultimatum on the playing of the ancient and out of tune accordion in the house: “it stops or I go.” Michael loves his wife somewhat more than his accordion and with some joy purchased the second of his three accordions. He has since added a concertina and a number of other ‘wheezy’ instruments to his collection.

Among his many ongoing activities, Michael plays his third accordion about once a month with Holy Trinity’s house band, Fallen Angles. He also plays from time to time with other musical combinations and has been known to preach a sermon or two.

Michael mshapcott_caricaturecelebrated his 60th birthday last June with a surprise party thrown by Ann and his daughter Nicole and with the help of many of us here at Holy Trinity. Jim Houston captured Michael in this caricature which shows his love of bow ties, shorts, colourful socks, housing and accordions all in a single image.

Thanks for all your work with and for Holy Trinity and and for the whole community Michael! Looking forward to a bright future together. There’s just a couple of things we have to do.

Stay Awake!

Advent Sermon by Jennifer Henry

I met Bishop Sofie Petersen at the World Council of Churches Assembly in Busan. An Indigenous woman, the Lutheran Bishop of Greenland, she is rooted in the challenges and experiences of her community and spiritually wise. I had the delight of listening in on an animated discussion between Bishop Sofie and National Indigenous Bishop Mark MacDonald, former Bishop of Alaska, about the delicacies of Arctic foods I could not even imagine. Bishop Sofie wants us to know that two of her churches need to move because the permafrost is disappearing in her country, foundations “bowing and bending”, the churches cannot be saved.  Hunters and fishermen are being dramatically affected by extreme weather. The shrimp population is decreasing and hungry polar bears are showing up in towns. She, on the frontlines of climate change, begs us to see what’s coming everywhere: stay awake.

Full sermon on Kairos website