Category Archives: Worship Services

Sunday, July 3rd – more Pride at Holy Trinity

Joins us for Pride Part II this Sunday at 10:30 AM A reprise of the True Colours and Pulse by Melissa Ethridge will be performed along with some repeated readings. New music will be there and our musician will be William Aide.

Parade follows.proud anglicans

To be a Proud Anglican visit their Facebook page.

 

Last week’s bulletin can be found here: HT bulletin Sun Jun 26 6th Pent & Pride

 

 

 

 

 

Pride Sunday with MPP Cheri DiNovo – June 26

rainbow-stripOur guest homilist on Pride Sunday at HT (June 26) will be MPP Cheri DiNovo, long-time activist for LGBTQ rights and an ordained United Church minister. Named by NOW readers in 2015 as Best MPP.

From her official bio:

Cheri has been a 40+ year activist for LGBTQ issues. She was the only woman in Canada to sign the ‘We Demand’ statement in 1971—the first demand for gay rights on Parliament Hill. In 2012, Cheri succeeded in getting Toby’s Act passed, an amendment to the Ontario Human Rights Code to include gender identity and gender expression–the first of its kind in North America.

Continue reading Pride Sunday with MPP Cheri DiNovo – June 26

Picnic This Sunday – NO SERVICE AT CHURCH

SERVICE – PICNIC

picnic-basket-150x150Sunday, June 19, 2016 @ 11:00 AM

Area 26 in High Park (directions below)

Join us and invite your friends!

Service: 11:00 AM in Area 26 at High Park, this is the only service on June 19. Sherman will coordinate a team to provide a bilingual expression of worship that includes all ages.

  • Picnic: The parishes of San Esteban and St. Paul’s will be joining us. The three communities will be provide: BBQ’s, beverages, hamburgers & veggie burgers along with meat & veggie hotdogs.

  • Please bring a picnic side dish to share with a serving utensil. Plates, napkins, & cutlery will be provided. You may want to bring a folding chair or blanket to sit on.

Continue reading Picnic This Sunday – NO SERVICE AT CHURCH

Prisons we choose to live in – Homily May 8, 2016

To see music and readings that surrounded this homily:

HT bulletin Sun May 8, 2016 Easter 7 C

God knows – Canada has more than enough jails.
In 2013, the Correctional Commissioner for Canada reported to Parliament that the number of prisoners in federal and provincial jails was at an all-time high, even though crime rates have been steadily dropping for more than two decades.
He noted that indigenous people make up 25% of the prison population, even though they form only 4% of the overall population of Canada.

He noted that there had been a 75% increase in the number of visible minority prisoners in the past decade.
The International Centre for Prison Studies reported that, in 2015, Canada had 106 prisoners per 100,000 population.
That’s a big number, but pales in comparison with the United States – where they have an astonishing 698 inmates per 100,000 population.

Here in Toronto, the relatively new Toronto South Detention Centre is a huge facility – with a capacity of almost 2,000 inmates although it is still only partly filled. Some of the inmates are men serving sentences of less than two years, but many are in remand – that is, they in jail awaiting trial or some other proceeding. They have not been convicted, but they are in jail – sometimes for days, sometimes for weeks, sometimes longer. Continue reading Prisons we choose to live in – Homily May 8, 2016

“I thirst…” Ecumenical Good Friday Walk

2016 TORONTO GOOD FRIDAY WALK TO FOCUS ON WATER

Jesus’ cry from the cross, “I am thirsty,” is the impetus for this year’s Ecumenical Good Friday Walk for Justice in downtown Toronto.

On the traditional territory of the Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation, we will walk in the Lake Ontario Waterfront watershed, starting on the shore of Lake Ontario at Harbour Square Park, just west of the ferry docks at the foot of Bay Street.  Participants will gather at 2 p.m., then proceed north on Bay Street, stopping at ‘stations’ along the way to decry the unjust use of the divine gift of water leading to environmental degradation and vast numbers of refugees.

The Walk will end at the Church of the Holy Trinity (just west of the Eaton Centre) for a brief worship service and message from Jennifer Henry, Executive Director of Kairos. “The health of water is about the health of our communities — not only the quality of our relations with the earth community within watersheds, but also the nature of relationships with Indigenous peoples as the original custodians of water,” Henry says.

A simple supper will take place there at approximately 4:00 p.m. A freewill offering will support the efforts of participating social justice organizations.

As Jesus cried out in thirst from the Cross, we too thirst for justice – for the environment and for all creatures adversely affected by systems that misuse or destroy Earth, our sacred home.

History of the walk and past walk pictures on their website.

Holy Week at Holy Trinity

You are invited to join us for the whole Easter Story or just what speaks to your soul.

Services:

  • Sunday, March 20 10:30 AM Palm Sunday Service with the procession of Palms – separate program for youth and children
  • Thursday,  March 24 6:00 PM Maundy Thursday with service, supper that involves youth, children, and the San Esteban (Spanish speaking) community. A family sleepover follows
  • Friday, March 25 10:30 AM Solemn Good Friday Liturgy with Choral Music.  Program provided for young people.
  • Friday, March 25 2:00 PM Ecumenical Good Friday Walk for Justice theme this year is “I thirst…” This year the walk will begin at Lake Ontario and proceed up Bay Street to Holy Trinity.  Details on the EGFW  website
  • Saturday, March 26 8:00 PM The Great Vigil of Easter This service includes Biblical readings, the lighting of the Paschal Fire and a service of light, remembering our baptismal vows, and the First Eucharist of Easter. Young people and families are active in the leadership of the service.
  • Sunday, March 27 10:30 AM Easter Eucharist with an all ages present. We will flower the cross and share the Eucharist followed by a celebratory lunch and Easter Egg Hunt. We will use both English and Spanish in this service.

a long walk to freedom

On February 21 at 10:30am we will reprise a powerful theme from last year: “Freedom”. We’ve been digging the roots of african-american spirituals. We were particularly moved by an interview and song sharing with Joe Carter you can listen to here. I would encourage you to listen, whether you are going to attend this service or not. It is very powerful.

a long walk to freedom

The spirituals were not just songs about god, they carried hopes for literal freedom, secret resistance and, unimpressed with the religion of the masters, a claiming of the person of Jesus for themselves and as a way to reconnect with the high god they had been separated from by the ocean. While some of the language, particularly the word Lord, can be hard for some of us who consider ourselves modern and progressive, entering into the world of the composers and singers of this music was powerful for us and we hope to capture some of that power in our service this month and share it with the whole community.

The music will be mostly traditional spirituals, but we will be using a few more recent songs as well

Reflections on 1 Corinthians chapter 13 – a homily by Michael Creal

Homily Jan 31,2016 — Michael Creal

Michael Creal

Today’s readings provide rich fare for reflection and commentary but following the principle that sometimes less is more, I’m not going to deal with either the Isaiah passage or the gospel passage, important as they are. Instead, I’m going to focus on Paul, and that chapter from first Corinthians. [Ch. 13]

Just to contrast some features of the contemporary world with what Paul sets out in that famous chapter, let me draw to your attention the movie, The Big Short. If you have seen it, you will probably agree that it is pretty chilling stuff. It’s about four stock traders (and, of
course, there were many like them)in the period of the 2008 crash who saw they could make a killing by selling to unsuspecting buyers bundles of mortgages that they knew would eventually be worthless). Continue reading Reflections on 1 Corinthians chapter 13 – a homily by Michael Creal