Category Archives: history

From the roof of HT in 1974


An amazing image shared with us this week by the photographer William Perry.

I walked into the church with a 4×5 camera, big tripod and a couple dozen 4×5 negative cartridges, maybe 50 pounds and asked “Can I go up on the roof to take some photos” and someone took me to the staircase in the turret up to the edge of the roof and I dragged the equipment up to the peak.

[Note to any contemporary roof climbers: sorry, no. It’s not 1974]

Looking towards Yonge Street.

Canada By Treaty: Histories of a Negotiated Place

April 28 – May 25, Hart House Map Room Exhibit 

The exhibit explores treaties, those legal agreements with Indigenous peoples that allowed non-Indigenous people to live on and own land in what is now Canada. The four-week exhibit responds to the 150th anniversary of Confederation by explaining in accessible language the long history of treaty making, and how and why these agreements were essential to the foundation of modern Canada. Co-curated by fourth year undergraduate James Bird, Nehiyawak (Cree), Indigenous Studies and Architecture, and Department of History Professors Laurie Bertram and Heidi Bohaker, the exhibit draws on content created by students in Professor Bohaker’s Fall 2016 joint fourth year/graduate seminar “Canada By Treaty.”

More information at UofT website

Walking Taddle Creek @ Church of the Holy Trinity

When: Saturday, April 29 at 10:45 AM

Meet: Church of the Holy Trinity, 19 Trinity Square

As part of our exploration of the land we are a part of and its history, we will be taking a walk along Taddle Creek with Helen Mills of Lost Rivers. We hope that anyone who considers themselves part of our neighbourhood will join us as we ground ourselves in this place.

This walk is part of a larger project of understanding ourselves as part of this land. You can read more about that here.

Taddle Creek has been out of sight a long time, but there have been a number of articles and efforts to bring it back to light. Here is a post on BlogTO from 2012

We plan to leave promptly at 11am and return for lunch at 1pm. Please RSVP to knunn@holytrinitytoronto.org if you intend to come.

becoming part of the land

As part of our ongoing work and hope for reconciliation with indigenous people, we realise that we need to change our understanding of who we are and to whom we belong. Through the season of Lent this year, we will be exploring our relationship with the land we share–the land our building is part of, the land we live on, the other people who share this land.

We invite any and all who share this place with us to join us in this process:

More information will be added to this page as details firm up. If you would like to  be notified of specifics or to ask questions, feel free to contact Keith at knunn@holytrinitytoronto.org

Final four shows Thursday, Friday, Saturday!

This dramatisation of the nativity story has been performed every December since 1938. It was first performed at St. Martin’s-in-the-fields in London and brought to Toronto complete with script and costumes by Patricia Frank who was the daughter of St. Martin’s vicar and then married his student John Frank who became priest at Holy Trinity. 2016 performances:

Evening shows 7:30 PM:  Thursday, December 22 and Friday, December 23

Afternoon shows 4:30 PM: Saturday, December 24

Special for this year! Christmas Eve at 1:30 PM

Book Tickets

“Gently to Nagasaki— The Toronto Book Launch” Thursday, Nov 10 7:30 PM

Thursday, November 10 7:30 PM “Gently to Nagasaki— The Toronto Book Launch” at The Church of Holy Trinity (19 Trinity Sq, Toronto, ON, M5G 1B1). Free admission and open to the public. Books available for sale by Ben McNally Books. No RSVP required.
Joy Kogawa will be joined on stage by Mary Jo Leddy, CM. Both authors will speak to their deep knowledge of forgiveness, assuredness, and trust in the context of today’s desires of repairing personal and cultural relationships. Both events are truly accessible masterclasses on self-healing and sincerity. More info available

Another related event is taking place on Friday, October 28 at 4 PM “A Dream of Reconciliation,” a conversation between Joy Kogawa, Bishop Patrick Yu, and Olivia Chow. Hosted by Caitlin Press and The Cheng Yu Tung East Asian Library at the Cheng Yu Tung East Asian Library (8th floor, Robarts Library, 130 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A5).
Admission is free. Light refreshments provided. All are welcome. Books will be available for sale by Nikkei Books. The author will be available for signing. Reserve your seat

Holy Trinity Opens its Doors May 27 & 28

Drop by any time on Saturday May 27th from 11 AM to 3 PM or Sunday, May 28th noon to 3 PM.

Experience the grandeur of our space. Listen to our instruments. Learn about our history and our present with displays of stories and pictures. Take time for a tour or scavenger hunt.

On Saturday from noon to 2 PM Ian Grundy, music director and some students he works with will play both the organ and new Steinway piano.

At 2:00 PM hear the Penthelia Singers perform a 30 minute Concert.  Penthelia Singers is a Toronto-based women’s chamber choir performing culturally diverse and musically sophisticated repertoire.  Their performance at Doors Open will include music selections from their upcoming concert, “In the Kitchen”, including the toe-tapping folk music of Eastern Canada and much more. www.penthelia.com

“Lost but not Forgotten” Memorial at the Huronia Regional Centre cemetery on Sunday May 8th

On behalf of survivors and allies in Remember Every Name, I want to invite you to the “Lost but not Forgotten” Memorial at the Huronia Regional Centre cemetery on Sunday May 8th.

This will take place from 1:30 to 4:00 PM at Huronia Regional Centre Cemetery 650 Memorial Avenue Orillia.

Lots of details on their Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/events/252014511814115/

or contact remembereveryname@gmail.com or 705-645-0298
Poster B&W

We would welcome Holy Trinity and any other faith group people to say a blessing – in whatever tradition is theirs. Survivors say that most people were buried in this cemetery without funerals. They remember that their friends just disappeared.

Feb 11 7:00 PM – Victoria Freeman speaks What does it mean to say we are “treaty people” in Toronto?

JOIN Victoria Freeman and Zachary Smith

at the Church of the Holy Trinity
Trinity Square, Toronto (west of the Eaton Centre)

What does it mean to say we are “treaty people” in Toronto?

What are the treaty relationships that shape (or could/should shape) relationships between Indigenous peoples and between Indigenous peoples and newcomers in the Toronto area?

Victoria Freeman is the author of Distant Relations: How My Ancestors Colonized North America, and teaches in the History and Canadian Studies Programs at York University. Her 2010 dissertation, “‘Toronto Has No History!’ Indigeneity, Settler Colonialism and Historical Memory in Canada’s Largest City,” focused on the Indigenous and colonial history of the Greater Toronto Area. She is also a member of First Story Toronto,  based at the Native Canadian Centre of Toronto, and has been a long-time activist working to further decolonization and reconciliation, including through the arts.

Zachary Smith is a second year PhD student in the Department of History at the University of Toronto where he studies Indigenous political history, and treaty-making in the Great Lakes. Of Anishinaabe ancestry, he has also worked as a researcher for Chiefs of Ontario.

Thursday, February 11th at 7:00 PM
(light supper at 6:00 in the Cafe)

You are encouraged to read these articles in preparation for Thursday’s conversations.

History of a Friendship – freeman

Indigenous Hauntings – freeman