Category Archives: Justice Issues

Canada By Treaty: Histories of a Negotiated Place

April 28 – May 25, Hart House Map Room Exhibit 

The exhibit explores treaties, those legal agreements with Indigenous peoples that allowed non-Indigenous people to live on and own land in what is now Canada. The four-week exhibit responds to the 150th anniversary of Confederation by explaining in accessible language the long history of treaty making, and how and why these agreements were essential to the foundation of modern Canada. Co-curated by fourth year undergraduate James Bird, Nehiyawak (Cree), Indigenous Studies and Architecture, and Department of History Professors Laurie Bertram and Heidi Bohaker, the exhibit draws on content created by students in Professor Bohaker’s Fall 2016 joint fourth year/graduate seminar “Canada By Treaty.”

More information at UofT website

Walking Taddle Creek @ Church of the Holy Trinity

When: Saturday, April 29 at 10:45 AM

Meet: Church of the Holy Trinity, 19 Trinity Square

As part of our exploration of the land we are a part of and its history, we will be taking a walk along Taddle Creek with Helen Mills of Lost Rivers. We hope that anyone who considers themselves part of our neighbourhood will join us as we ground ourselves in this place.

This walk is part of a larger project of understanding ourselves as part of this land. You can read more about that here.

Taddle Creek has been out of sight a long time, but there have been a number of articles and efforts to bring it back to light. Here is a post on BlogTO from 2012

We plan to leave promptly at 11am and return for lunch at 1pm. Please RSVP to knunn@holytrinitytoronto.org if you intend to come.

A sip of ancient water

March 19, 2017; Holy Trinity.
Exodus 17: 1-7; John 4: 5-42

I’m sharing this image today by Issac Murcdoch on the pulpit in gratitude and respect to all the water keepers who are currently on the front lines of the struggle to protect sacred water. I made a small
handout on the 2017 Water Walk with Josephine Mandarin if you would like to know more.

Water is primal.

If you think about it, this planet should really be called water, not earth, since more than 70% of the surface is water, not land. Water — there there can be no life without it. Our bodies are 60% water – we are made of it. It’s the building block of our cells, the body’s transport system, a shock-absorber, it helps to regulate our temperature. Just give your hands a squeeze together and remind yourself that we are full of water – hopefully this doesn’t cause a mass exodus to the bathroom. Here’s the cool part, or the scary part, depending on which way it goes, not only are we full of water, but we are full of the water that’s around us. So if you’ve lived your life in Toronto, your body is 60% full of Lake Ontario.

Every time I hear it, I also find it quite marvellous to remember that the overall amount of water on the planet has remained the same for the last billion years. So we are made of the water that dinosaurs sipped. We are connected to this lake that in its ancient form was home to giant beavers, that was known as Skanadario, or sparkling water to Haudenosaunee people.

Read the full homily in this PDF document

four names added to homeless memorial

As extreme cold weather grips the city, the names of four people who died on Toronto streets in the month of February were added to the Homeless Memorial yesterday.

“The City of Toronto’s negligence means that at today’s Homeless Memorial we added four names of men who died in February,” Cathy Crowe, Toronto street nurse and homeless advocate, writes on Facebook. “One was a 28-year-old Indigenous man whose death has been widely reported as he was unable to get a mat overnight in the filled to capacity overnight drop-in/warming centre. Another was a man in his 30s.”

From Torontoist, March 15, 2017 — http://torontoist.com/2017/03/four-names-added-torontos-homeless-memorial/

becoming part of the land

As part of our ongoing work and hope for reconciliation with indigenous people, we realise that we need to change our understanding of who we are and to whom we belong. Through the season of Lent this year, we will be exploring our relationship with the land we share–the land our building is part of, the land we live on, the other people who share this land.

We invite any and all who share this place with us to join us in this process:

More information will be added to this page as details firm up. If you would like to  be notified of specifics or to ask questions, feel free to contact Keith at knunn@holytrinitytoronto.org

Homeless Memorial January 10 noon

Join us next week for the first 2017 memorial. We will gather outside for 20 to 30 minutes and then enjoy a light lunch together inside.

There maybe an opportunity to create quilt squares.

This event and the actual recording of names takes on even more importance in the face of new approaches to counting people without homes.

Read The Globe and Mail article

Go to our main memorial page

Keepers of the Water Vigil 7:00 PM Jan 11

All are welcome to join us on Wednesday, January 11 at 7 PM for this moving reflective service.

 

Organized by Toronto Urban Native Ministry, the Diocese of Toronto Creation Matters committee, and the Church of the Holy Trinity, this service incorporates Indigenous and Christian traditions around the blessing of water and valuing of its role in God’s creation.

Bishop-elect Riscylla Walsh Shaw will preside.

 

An Evening with the Marion Singers January 28

Come join us for a night of music and drinks in support of a great cause!

refugee-committee

 

 

 

 

 

We will open the doors of Church of the Holy Trinity, 19 Trinity Square, Toronto at 7 pm

Price: Adult:$20
Student:$15

Drinks available for purchase throughout the evening

Purchase tickets online  Print our Marion-singers-poster

For more information on the Church and its Refugee Committee, check us out online.

Have any questions? Feel free to email us at:
holytrinityrefugee@gmail.com

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By then end of 2015, The United Nations Refugee Agency reported 65.3 million people were displaced from their homes. This means every 60 seconds, 24 people were forced to flee due to conflict or persecution.

Continue reading An Evening with the Marion Singers January 28

Worship hosted by Refugee Committee 10:30 AM December 11

10:30 AM Worship service including Erefugee-trioucharist/Communion prepared by The Holy Trinity Refugee Committee
and the Sidra Project

Including an immersive experience viewing the short film
Clouds over Sidra
using virtual reality technology.

After the service you will be invited to engage in a dialogue
About the Sidra experience, the global refugee crisis and hear about
the work of our refugee committee.