Category Archives: Indigenous

Canada By Treaty: Histories of a Negotiated Place

April 28 – May 25, Hart House Map Room Exhibit 

The exhibit explores treaties, those legal agreements with Indigenous peoples that allowed non-Indigenous people to live on and own land in what is now Canada. The four-week exhibit responds to the 150th anniversary of Confederation by explaining in accessible language the long history of treaty making, and how and why these agreements were essential to the foundation of modern Canada. Co-curated by fourth year undergraduate James Bird, Nehiyawak (Cree), Indigenous Studies and Architecture, and Department of History Professors Laurie Bertram and Heidi Bohaker, the exhibit draws on content created by students in Professor Bohaker’s Fall 2016 joint fourth year/graduate seminar “Canada By Treaty.”

More information at UofT website

A sip of ancient water

March 19, 2017; Holy Trinity.
Exodus 17: 1-7; John 4: 5-42

I’m sharing this image today by Issac Murcdoch on the pulpit in gratitude and respect to all the water keepers who are currently on the front lines of the struggle to protect sacred water. I made a small
handout on the 2017 Water Walk with Josephine Mandarin if you would like to know more.

Water is primal.

If you think about it, this planet should really be called water, not earth, since more than 70% of the surface is water, not land. Water — there there can be no life without it. Our bodies are 60% water – we are made of it. It’s the building block of our cells, the body’s transport system, a shock-absorber, it helps to regulate our temperature. Just give your hands a squeeze together and remind yourself that we are full of water – hopefully this doesn’t cause a mass exodus to the bathroom. Here’s the cool part, or the scary part, depending on which way it goes, not only are we full of water, but we are full of the water that’s around us. So if you’ve lived your life in Toronto, your body is 60% full of Lake Ontario.

Every time I hear it, I also find it quite marvellous to remember that the overall amount of water on the planet has remained the same for the last billion years. So we are made of the water that dinosaurs sipped. We are connected to this lake that in its ancient form was home to giant beavers, that was known as Skanadario, or sparkling water to Haudenosaunee people.

Read the full homily in this PDF document

becoming part of the land

As part of our ongoing work and hope for reconciliation with indigenous people, we realise that we need to change our understanding of who we are and to whom we belong. Through the season of Lent this year, we will be exploring our relationship with the land we share–the land our building is part of, the land we live on, the other people who share this land.

We invite any and all who share this place with us to join us in this process:

More information will be added to this page as details firm up. If you would like to  be notified of specifics or to ask questions, feel free to contact Keith at knunn@holytrinitytoronto.org

Keepers of the Water Vigil 7:00 PM Jan 11

All are welcome to join us on Wednesday, January 11 at 7 PM for this moving reflective service.

 

Organized by Toronto Urban Native Ministry, the Diocese of Toronto Creation Matters committee, and the Church of the Holy Trinity, this service incorporates Indigenous and Christian traditions around the blessing of water and valuing of its role in God’s creation.

Bishop-elect Riscylla Walsh Shaw will preside.

 

Potluck Supper 5 PM followed by walk to Sisters in Spirit Vigil

Treaty People of Holy Trinity will gather for a potluck supper and time together in the west end of the church (19 Trinity Square) by the kitchen to share food before we join the Native Women’s Resource Centre of Toronto

SISTERS IN SPIRIT VIGIL 2016.
Come join us on Tuesday, October 4th in this annual event as we raise awareness and honor the lives of murdered and missing Indigenous women.

Vigil will take place at Allan Gardens starting at 6:30pm with Aboriginal speakers and performers, painted rock installation, and a moment of silence with candle lighting to honor MMIW.

Canada and First Nations – Our Shared History – Aug 11

blanket exercise feetBefore there can be reconciliation, there must be truth. The Treaty People group is hosting a pair of Kairos Blanket Exercises on August 11. One at noon and again at 5:30pm.

The Blanket Exercise is a visceral way to hear and enter into the history of indigenous peoples and settlers in North America. It provides a starting point for doing the work the Truth and Reconciliation Commission has asked of all Canadians.

This event is aimed at all citizens and residents of Canada and those curious about the history of Canada with respect to indigenous peoples. We invite you to join us for the Kairos Blanket Exercise at noon (or 5:30pm), to be followed by an age appropriate circle and discussion. If you can’t spare more than an hour, the exercise is still worthwhile, but be aware that it is profoundly affecting and we encourage you to stay for the second hour to build relationships.

We will serve a light meal of soup and bread.

See www.kairosblanketexercise.org to get a better understanding of this experiential workshop.

Let us know you are coming by visiting our Facebook events: KBE at noon, KBE at 5:30pm.

Please feel free to print and hang our Kairos Blanket Exercise poster.

treatypeople

Follow-up document: “What can I do?”

Intergenerational Blanket Exercise 2 PM Sunday, February 21

blanket exercise feetThe Treaty People group at Holy Trinity is hosting an Intergenerational Blanket Exercise on February 21 at 2pm using the KAIROS process.

The Blanket Exercise is a visceral way to hear and enter into the history of indigenous peoples and settlers in North America. It provides a starting point for doing the work the Truth and Reconciliation Commission has asked of all Canadians.

This event is aimed at people of all ages in faith communities in downtown Toronto. We invite you to join us for the Blanket Exercise at 2pm, to be followed by an age appropriate circle and discussion.
We will screen a topical film at 1pm for those who find it easier to arrive earlier.

See www.kairosblanketexercise.org to get a better understanding of this experiential workshop.

Let us know you are coming by visiting our Facebook Event.

Please feel free to print and hang our
Blanket Exercise Poster

Feb 11 7:00 PM – Victoria Freeman speaks What does it mean to say we are “treaty people” in Toronto?

JOIN Victoria Freeman and Zachary Smith

at the Church of the Holy Trinity
Trinity Square, Toronto (west of the Eaton Centre)

What does it mean to say we are “treaty people” in Toronto?

What are the treaty relationships that shape (or could/should shape) relationships between Indigenous peoples and between Indigenous peoples and newcomers in the Toronto area?

Victoria Freeman is the author of Distant Relations: How My Ancestors Colonized North America, and teaches in the History and Canadian Studies Programs at York University. Her 2010 dissertation, “‘Toronto Has No History!’ Indigeneity, Settler Colonialism and Historical Memory in Canada’s Largest City,” focused on the Indigenous and colonial history of the Greater Toronto Area. She is also a member of First Story Toronto,  based at the Native Canadian Centre of Toronto, and has been a long-time activist working to further decolonization and reconciliation, including through the arts.

Zachary Smith is a second year PhD student in the Department of History at the University of Toronto where he studies Indigenous political history, and treaty-making in the Great Lakes. Of Anishinaabe ancestry, he has also worked as a researcher for Chiefs of Ontario.

Thursday, February 11th at 7:00 PM
(light supper at 6:00 in the Cafe)

You are encouraged to read these articles in preparation for Thursday’s conversations.

History of a Friendship – freeman

Indigenous Hauntings – freeman

Ecumenical Working Group on Residential Schools

Reflections to Spark Conversation on Christian Theology

April 2015 It has been 45 years since the formal participation of mainline Christian churches in the Indian residential school system was dramatically reduced, and more than 25 years since survivors began confronting those in the church with the disastrous consequences of that system on themselves, their families, their communities, languages and cultures. For a long time, the churches avoided coming to terms with this history and its legacy. The subject of residential schools has been shrouded in silence and justified by a veneer of “good intentions.” It only has been relatively recently that churches have begun to reflect in deep humility on the theological assumptions and interpretations that gave rise to the churches’ complicity in this evil. This paper proposes that theological colleges, learning centres, and scholars have vital roles to play in supporting deeper theological engagement with this topic. Continue reading Ecumenical Working Group on Residential Schools