Tag Archives: indigenous

Potluck Supper 5 PM followed by walk to Sisters in Spirit Vigil

Treaty People of Holy Trinity will gather for a potluck supper and time together in the west end of the church (19 Trinity Square) by the kitchen to share food before we join the Native Women’s Resource Centre of Toronto

SISTERS IN SPIRIT VIGIL 2016.
Come join us on Tuesday, October 4th in this annual event as we raise awareness and honor the lives of murdered and missing Indigenous women.

Vigil will take place at Allan Gardens starting at 6:30pm with Aboriginal speakers and performers, painted rock installation, and a moment of silence with candle lighting to honor MMIW.

Canada and First Nations – Our Shared History – Aug 11

blanket exercise feetBefore there can be reconciliation, there must be truth. The Treaty People group is hosting a pair of Kairos Blanket Exercises on August 11. One at noon and again at 5:30pm.

The Blanket Exercise is a visceral way to hear and enter into the history of indigenous peoples and settlers in North America. It provides a starting point for doing the work the Truth and Reconciliation Commission has asked of all Canadians.

This event is aimed at all citizens and residents of Canada and those curious about the history of Canada with respect to indigenous peoples. We invite you to join us for the Kairos Blanket Exercise at noon (or 5:30pm), to be followed by an age appropriate circle and discussion. If you can’t spare more than an hour, the exercise is still worthwhile, but be aware that it is profoundly affecting and we encourage you to stay for the second hour to build relationships.

We will serve a light meal of soup and bread.

See www.kairosblanketexercise.org to get a better understanding of this experiential workshop.

Let us know you are coming by visiting our Facebook events: KBE at noon, KBE at 5:30pm.

Please feel free to print and hang our Kairos Blanket Exercise poster.

treatypeople

Follow-up document: “What can I do?”

“Water is the blood that flows through this wounded body”

A reflection on Water For Ecumenical Good Friday,
Church of the Holy Trinity, March 25 2016

Who lives the pain of Good Friday in our time? Communities of Pimicikamak /Cross Lake, Syria, South Sudan, Kashechewan…

Where do we hear the cries? Taste the thirst for justice? Refugees fleeing, women sexually assaulted, black lives ignored, Indigenous girls missing…

Where do we see the wounds? Melting permafrost, fracked earth, tailings ponds, tanker spills… Continue reading “Water is the blood that flows through this wounded body”

“I thirst…” Ecumenical Good Friday Walk

2016 TORONTO GOOD FRIDAY WALK TO FOCUS ON WATER

Jesus’ cry from the cross, “I am thirsty,” is the impetus for this year’s Ecumenical Good Friday Walk for Justice in downtown Toronto.

On the traditional territory of the Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation, we will walk in the Lake Ontario Waterfront watershed, starting on the shore of Lake Ontario at Harbour Square Park, just west of the ferry docks at the foot of Bay Street.  Participants will gather at 2 p.m., then proceed north on Bay Street, stopping at ‘stations’ along the way to decry the unjust use of the divine gift of water leading to environmental degradation and vast numbers of refugees.

The Walk will end at the Church of the Holy Trinity (just west of the Eaton Centre) for a brief worship service and message from Jennifer Henry, Executive Director of Kairos. “The health of water is about the health of our communities — not only the quality of our relations with the earth community within watersheds, but also the nature of relationships with Indigenous peoples as the original custodians of water,” Henry says.

A simple supper will take place there at approximately 4:00 p.m. A freewill offering will support the efforts of participating social justice organizations.

As Jesus cried out in thirst from the Cross, we too thirst for justice – for the environment and for all creatures adversely affected by systems that misuse or destroy Earth, our sacred home.

History of the walk and past walk pictures on their website.

Intergenerational Blanket Exercise 2 PM Sunday, February 21

blanket exercise feetThe Treaty People group at Holy Trinity is hosting an Intergenerational Blanket Exercise on February 21 at 2pm using the KAIROS process.

The Blanket Exercise is a visceral way to hear and enter into the history of indigenous peoples and settlers in North America. It provides a starting point for doing the work the Truth and Reconciliation Commission has asked of all Canadians.

This event is aimed at people of all ages in faith communities in downtown Toronto. We invite you to join us for the Blanket Exercise at 2pm, to be followed by an age appropriate circle and discussion.
We will screen a topical film at 1pm for those who find it easier to arrive earlier.

See www.kairosblanketexercise.org to get a better understanding of this experiential workshop.

Let us know you are coming by visiting our Facebook Event.

Please feel free to print and hang our
Blanket Exercise Poster

Feb 11 7:00 PM – Victoria Freeman speaks What does it mean to say we are “treaty people” in Toronto?

JOIN Victoria Freeman and Zachary Smith

at the Church of the Holy Trinity
Trinity Square, Toronto (west of the Eaton Centre)

What does it mean to say we are “treaty people” in Toronto?

What are the treaty relationships that shape (or could/should shape) relationships between Indigenous peoples and between Indigenous peoples and newcomers in the Toronto area?

Victoria Freeman is the author of Distant Relations: How My Ancestors Colonized North America, and teaches in the History and Canadian Studies Programs at York University. Her 2010 dissertation, “‘Toronto Has No History!’ Indigeneity, Settler Colonialism and Historical Memory in Canada’s Largest City,” focused on the Indigenous and colonial history of the Greater Toronto Area. She is also a member of First Story Toronto,  based at the Native Canadian Centre of Toronto, and has been a long-time activist working to further decolonization and reconciliation, including through the arts.

Zachary Smith is a second year PhD student in the Department of History at the University of Toronto where he studies Indigenous political history, and treaty-making in the Great Lakes. Of Anishinaabe ancestry, he has also worked as a researcher for Chiefs of Ontario.

Thursday, February 11th at 7:00 PM
(light supper at 6:00 in the Cafe)

You are encouraged to read these articles in preparation for Thursday’s conversations.

History of a Friendship – freeman

Indigenous Hauntings – freeman

Keepers of the Water – Wed, Jan 13 6:30 PM

KeepersOfTheWater2016“Keepers of the Water: A Vigil of Lament and Celebration” (Toronto), January 14 6:30 PM
The Church of the Holy Trinity (10 Trinity Square, beside the Eaton Centre, Toronto) will be hosting the annual Keepers of the Water vigil on Wednesday January 14 at 6:30 p.m.

Bishop Mark MacDonald, National Indigenous Anglican Bishop for the Anglican Church of Canada, will preside over this evening of reflection, song, and prayer in celebration of the blessings of water.
All are welcome at this free event.

Want to know more read about last year’s service here.

Mary’s Song

MarysSong

This service is on opportunity to delve into Mary’s song musically, emotionally, and physically. The worship leadership will be moving from place to place and we invite you to participate in as many ways as you feel comfortable. We recognize that this does not fit our familiar pattern, but hope the richness of words, images, and actions will offer much to your spiritual experience this morning.

The service will be in 4 movements:

  1. Relationship (Family/community/gathering). Who do you run to? Who do you talk to?
  2. Revolution/Re-creation (Justice). “The arc of the universe bends toward justice.”
  3. Redress/Reconciliation (Jubilee). What is a good thing?
  4. Response (Action). How do we respond? What are we to do?

Continue reading Mary’s Song

TRC Findings #Readthereport

TRC_logo_eng
It’s critical that this work does not sit on the shelf.  Read these reports on your own, out loud in groups, in church, in meetings. Talk about them with your family, your neighbours, your co-workers.