Tag Archives: justice

Disrupting Empire – Jesus’ entry into Jerusalem as political theatre

Palm Sunday, March 29, 2015

texts: Paolo Freire, Pedagogy of the Oppressed; Zechariah 9:9-10; Mark 11:1-11

As Canadians and Christians we feel a lot of social pressure to be nice. To not cause trouble. Especially for folks who seem nice. Nobody should be distressed. Let’s keep everything, on the surface anyway, agreeable and pleasant. Well that’s nice isn’t it? Sometimes it’s even a good thing. But sometimes what is required is real honesty. Whether that’s telling our true feelings to a friend who needs to know, or speaking a difficult truth to those in power. Or even challenging our own assumptions.

However, that desire to smooth things over can be overwhelming at times. We may choose silence or couched words over challenging conversation. Or we may avoid someone or something altogether rather than offering a challenge and engagement that might spark personal growth or a healed relationship. Continue reading Disrupting Empire – Jesus’ entry into Jerusalem as political theatre

On the Edge of Wilderness

Isaiah 58:1-12, Mark 1: 1-13

You and I, we are standing on the edge of the wilderness with Jesus; you and I, on this first day of Lent, driven by the Spirit; you and I, on this Ash Wednesday, made of earth and water.  Remember you are dust and to dust you shall return.  Today, whatever our justice ministry, we are invited, reminded, compelled, driven to enter into the wilderness to confirm our identity, to remember our names, and to reclaim our integrity, finding each other along the way.
Continue reading On the Edge of Wilderness

Time for Reconciliation

Mark these dates: May 29-June 3 2015.

KAIROS_TimeForReconciliation_BANNER-300x80

Coinciding with the closing ceremonies of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) and the release of its final report, KAIROS’ Time for Reconciliation represents an ongoing commitment to reconciliation and relationship building.

In Ottawa, the action begins Friday afternoon, May 29 with KAIROS’ Intergenerational Gathering, which continues on Saturday, May 30. The Walk for Reconciliation, expected to draw thousands, is scheduled to begin Sunday morning, May 31. This day may also include an ecumenical worship service organized by local churches. Monday, June 1 features educational events hosted by KAIROS and the TRC. The TRC Final Report will be presented on Tuesday, June 2. A by-invitation ceremonial closing of the TRC will take place on Wednesday, June 3 and will include a community feast.   Stay tuned for a complete schedule of KAIROS events in Ottawa that support and complement TRC events.

There will be some Holy Trinitarians there for sure. Join us if you can.

More details at the KAIROS page.

Palm Sunday – Disrupting Empire

fist-palm3The story of Palm Sunday is a story of theatrical resistance: a usurping of entrenched authority. The procession into Jerusalem parodied the imperial triumphus of the roman occupiers and even that of earlier Jewish kings. Christ’s entry into Jerusalem claimed the imagery of power and turned it on its head–a donkey, not a war horse; children, beggars, parents and labourers, not an army and priests.  His entry proclaimed not imperial power, but a new realm of peace: a place where what matters are not the powers, but the people and the land itself.

Join Fallen Angles and the whole community of Holy Trinity as we consider Christ’s disruptive power in the face of empire, both then and now, in story, movement and song.

March 29 at 10:30am

Re-Membering: Rights and Relationships

Advent 4 – December 21, 2014
by Marilyn Dolmage

Today’s two Bible readings involve Faith and Mystery.
The Doxology in Romans tells the faithful that God “alone is wise.”
And we read in Luke that “Nothing will be impossible with God”:

Here, Mary and Elizabeth faithfully accept the mystery that pregnancy involves for every woman, but especially for them.
Their babies will fulfill predictions in the Old Testament.

How puzzling that the Messiah will come – not as a King…
but as a baby born into very humble and risky circumstances.
We know that the message he will one day communicate will be full of tensions, riddles and paradoxes.
People who are poor, sad, insulted, isolated, and persecuted are to have high status in this new kingdom … how can that be?
The Gospel radically challenges relationships of power. Continue reading Re-Membering: Rights and Relationships

‘Our work, as Christians in Canada today, is dissent’

I stumbled across a great article online. I think it puts the struggle to be faithful today in a helpful light:

Our job is to offer the wisdom of scripture: “Seek justice, love kindness, walk humbly with God.” …

Admittedly, it is a very wide mandate. So much justice-seeking to be done – justice for the land, suffering from runaway oil and gas exploitation and factory farms that are anything but kind. Justice in the face of agri-business that seeks a quick profit, not the long, slow, humble walking with the seasons and the soil that sustains it for our grandchildren. Justice for workers, suffering from anti-union legislation and secret trade deals that disempower them. Justice-seeking as new security legislation threatens to turn CSIS into a secret force, policing those whose legitimate protests – against a pipeline, say – might be construed as “interference with critical infrastructure.”

Read the whole article at EssentialSpirituality.com.

Refugee Service Homily

Holy Family RefugeesHomily given by Sherman Hesselgrave at a service held at St James Cathedral, Toronto, on February 1st, 2015, The Eve of the Feast of the Presentation of Jesus, to recognize parishes in the Diocese that have been engaged in ministry with refugees.

Malachi 3:1-4    Psalm 84:2-3, 5-6      Hebrews 2:14-18      Luke 2:22-40

In 1956, the Hungarian Revolution started with thousands of students marching peacefully through the streets of Budapest demanding an end to the Soviet occupation of Hungary. It was October 23rd, the day I turned four years old. The revolution had a short life, however. Twelve days later Nikita Khrushchev sent in the Red Army and the Hungarian forces were defeated. 200,000 Hungarians fled to the West, and about 6,000 of those refugees found their way to Ontario. We lived in Fort William at the time, and my father was the pastor of a Lutheran congregation that helped to settle one of those families. Their son was a little older than I, and I can still (believe it or not) visualize the red and green checked shirt that they gave me as a gift. I was too young to understand the political complexities, but I knew that this family who spoke a different language had come from far away and they needed our help making a new start. Continue reading Refugee Service Homily