Tag Archives: Treaty People

Canada and First Nations – Our Shared History – Aug 11

blanket exercise feetBefore there can be reconciliation, there must be truth. The Treaty People group is hosting a pair of Kairos Blanket Exercises on August 11. One at noon and again at 5:30pm.

The Blanket Exercise is a visceral way to hear and enter into the history of indigenous peoples and settlers in North America. It provides a starting point for doing the work the Truth and Reconciliation Commission has asked of all Canadians.

This event is aimed at all citizens and residents of Canada and those curious about the history of Canada with respect to indigenous peoples. We invite you to join us for the Kairos Blanket Exercise at noon (or 5:30pm), to be followed by an age appropriate circle and discussion. If you can’t spare more than an hour, the exercise is still worthwhile, but be aware that it is profoundly affecting and we encourage you to stay for the second hour to build relationships.

We will serve a light meal of soup and bread.

See www.kairosblanketexercise.org to get a better understanding of this experiential workshop.

Let us know you are coming by visiting our Facebook events: KBE at noon, KBE at 5:30pm.

Please feel free to print and hang our Kairos Blanket Exercise poster.

treatypeople

Follow-up document: “What can I do?”

“Water is the blood that flows through this wounded body”

A reflection on Water For Ecumenical Good Friday,
Church of the Holy Trinity, March 25 2016

Who lives the pain of Good Friday in our time? Communities of Pimicikamak /Cross Lake, Syria, South Sudan, Kashechewan…

Where do we hear the cries? Taste the thirst for justice? Refugees fleeing, women sexually assaulted, black lives ignored, Indigenous girls missing…

Where do we see the wounds? Melting permafrost, fracked earth, tailings ponds, tanker spills… Continue reading “Water is the blood that flows through this wounded body”

Intergenerational Blanket Exercise 2 PM Sunday, February 21

blanket exercise feetThe Treaty People group at Holy Trinity is hosting an Intergenerational Blanket Exercise on February 21 at 2pm using the KAIROS process.

The Blanket Exercise is a visceral way to hear and enter into the history of indigenous peoples and settlers in North America. It provides a starting point for doing the work the Truth and Reconciliation Commission has asked of all Canadians.

This event is aimed at people of all ages in faith communities in downtown Toronto. We invite you to join us for the Blanket Exercise at 2pm, to be followed by an age appropriate circle and discussion.
We will screen a topical film at 1pm for those who find it easier to arrive earlier.

See www.kairosblanketexercise.org to get a better understanding of this experiential workshop.

Let us know you are coming by visiting our Facebook Event.

Please feel free to print and hang our
Blanket Exercise Poster

Ecumenical Working Group on Residential Schools

Reflections to Spark Conversation on Christian Theology

April 2015 It has been 45 years since the formal participation of mainline Christian churches in the Indian residential school system was dramatically reduced, and more than 25 years since survivors began confronting those in the church with the disastrous consequences of that system on themselves, their families, their communities, languages and cultures. For a long time, the churches avoided coming to terms with this history and its legacy. The subject of residential schools has been shrouded in silence and justified by a veneer of “good intentions.” It only has been relatively recently that churches have begun to reflect in deep humility on the theological assumptions and interpretations that gave rise to the churches’ complicity in this evil. This paper proposes that theological colleges, learning centres, and scholars have vital roles to play in supporting deeper theological engagement with this topic. Continue reading Ecumenical Working Group on Residential Schools

TRC Findings #Readthereport

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It’s critical that this work does not sit on the shelf.  Read these reports on your own, out loud in groups, in church, in meetings. Talk about them with your family, your neighbours, your co-workers.

Recommended Reading for Treaty People

Books

(Alphabetical by Title)

  • Aboriginal Ontario (E.S. Rogers and Donald B. Smith,  971.30049 A15)
  • Dispersed but not destroyed coverDispersed but not Destroyed, A History of the Seventeenth-Century Wendat People (Kathryn Magee Labelle, 2013, 9780774825566)
    Situated within the area stretching from Georgian Bay in the north to Lake Simcoe in the east (also known as Wendake), the Wendat Confederacy flourished for two hundred years. By the mid-seventeenth century, however, Wendat society was under attack. Disease and warfare plagued the community, culminating in a series of Iroquois assaults that led to the dispersal of the Wendat people in 1649. Yet the Wendat did not disappear, as many historians have maintained. In Dispersed but Not Destroyed, Kathryn Magee Labelle examines the creation of a Wendat diaspora in the wake of the Iroquois attacks. By focusing the historical lens on the dispersal and its aftermath, she extends the seventeenth-century Wendat narrative. In the latter half of the century, Wendat leaders continued to appear at councils, trade negotiations, and diplomatic ventures — including the Great Peace of Montreal in 1701 — relying on established customs of accountability and consensus. Women also continued to assert their authority during this time, guiding their communities toward paths of cultural continuity and accommodation. Through tactics such as this, the power of the Wendat Confederacy and their unique identity was maintained. Turning the story of Wendat conquest on its head, this book demonstrates the resiliency of the Wendat people and writes a new chapter in North American history. (Notes by Keith)
  • Distant Relations coverDistant Relations: How My Ancestors Colonized North America (Victoria Freeman).
    In this interview on CBC’s 8th Fire the author talks about how she carries her grief, not guilt, about her ancestral role in colonization, and how grief is something we share.  She also makes the excellent point that colonialism is not over. (Notes by Susie)

     

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Booklets

  • kairos_strengthforclimbing-1Strength for Climbing: Steps on the Journey of Reconciliation
    August 2015. This booklet is designed to help non-Indigenous communities begin on a path of reconciliation with Indigenous peoples. Available for download on the KAIROS website.

Articles

(By Author)

Recommended Reading Lists

 

Reconciliation Actions you can take

heart garden creation 1

Lots was said and done when we received the Truth and Reconciliation Commission Report in early June. Our heart garden and an Anglican Church timeline poster continue to occupy space in our church over the summer. Some community actions will be planned for the fall.

What can you do to continue your own journey of reconciliation? Read the report and particularly the call to actions that is linked above. Take yourself to events that are hosted by Aboriginal communities. This weekend, August 1 & 2 Diane and Douglas Allen (Holy Trinity members afar) will be volunteering at the Wasauksing First Nation Powwow, on the Wasauksing
traditional grounds, Depot Harbour. Grand entry at noon both days. Details can be found here. Other upcoming Pow Wows in Ontario are listed here.

You might choose to learn more with some Indigenous summer reading recommended by CBC Next Chapter host Shelagh Rogers, CBC New Fire host, Lisa Charleyboy, and graphic novelist David Robertson

There are a couple of upcoming festivals highlighting art and culture from a variety of Aboriginal nations. Beginning this weekend Planet IndigenUS  4  gives prominence to the voices, stories and cultures of Indigenous people that are largely absent from the Canadian narrative and will be hosted at Harbourfront Centre and other locations until August 9th. ImagineNative Film & Media Arts Festival will take place in the fall, October 14 to 18, but will also be screening films at Harbourfront Centre over the next two weeks.

Aboriginal Art exhibits:

Now to August 31 Aboriginal Arts & Stories: Youth art exhibit at Parliament Street library. Laying the groundwork for cultural reconciliation and community healing, these young First Nations, Métis, and Inuit artists have presented interpretive pieces on Aboriginal culture and heritage through literary and visual arts for a chance to earn national recognition.

August Truth and Reconciliation: Special Exhibit on the legacy of residential schools at St. James Cathedral, 65 Church Street at King

Continue to walk on the path of reconciliation through these and other activities. Let us know what you do bbaskin@holytrinitytoronto.org