Tag Archives: water

Walking Taddle Creek @ Church of the Holy Trinity

When: Saturday, April 29 at 10:45 AM

Meet: Church of the Holy Trinity, 19 Trinity Square

As part of our exploration of the land we are a part of and its history, we will be taking a walk along Taddle Creek with Helen Mills of Lost Rivers. We hope that anyone who considers themselves part of our neighbourhood will join us as we ground ourselves in this place.

This walk is part of a larger project of understanding ourselves as part of this land. You can read more about that here.

Taddle Creek has been out of sight a long time, but there have been a number of articles and efforts to bring it back to light. Here is a post on BlogTO from 2012

We plan to leave promptly at 11am and return for lunch at 1pm. Please RSVP to knunn@holytrinitytoronto.org if you intend to come.

A sip of ancient water

March 19, 2017; Holy Trinity.
Exodus 17: 1-7; John 4: 5-42

I’m sharing this image today by Issac Murcdoch on the pulpit in gratitude and respect to all the water keepers who are currently on the front lines of the struggle to protect sacred water. I made a small
handout on the 2017 Water Walk with Josephine Mandarin if you would like to know more.

Water is primal.

If you think about it, this planet should really be called water, not earth, since more than 70% of the surface is water, not land. Water — there there can be no life without it. Our bodies are 60% water – we are made of it. It’s the building block of our cells, the body’s transport system, a shock-absorber, it helps to regulate our temperature. Just give your hands a squeeze together and remind yourself that we are full of water – hopefully this doesn’t cause a mass exodus to the bathroom. Here’s the cool part, or the scary part, depending on which way it goes, not only are we full of water, but we are full of the water that’s around us. So if you’ve lived your life in Toronto, your body is 60% full of Lake Ontario.

Every time I hear it, I also find it quite marvellous to remember that the overall amount of water on the planet has remained the same for the last billion years. So we are made of the water that dinosaurs sipped. We are connected to this lake that in its ancient form was home to giant beavers, that was known as Skanadario, or sparkling water to Haudenosaunee people.

Read the full homily in this PDF document

becoming part of the land

As part of our ongoing work and hope for reconciliation with indigenous people, we realise that we need to change our understanding of who we are and to whom we belong. Through the season of Lent this year, we will be exploring our relationship with the land we share–the land our building is part of, the land we live on, the other people who share this land.

We invite any and all who share this place with us to join us in this process:

More information will be added to this page as details firm up. If you would like to  be notified of specifics or to ask questions, feel free to contact Keith at knunn@holytrinitytoronto.org

“Water is the blood that flows through this wounded body”

A reflection on Water For Ecumenical Good Friday,
Church of the Holy Trinity, March 25 2016

Who lives the pain of Good Friday in our time? Communities of Pimicikamak /Cross Lake, Syria, South Sudan, Kashechewan…

Where do we hear the cries? Taste the thirst for justice? Refugees fleeing, women sexually assaulted, black lives ignored, Indigenous girls missing…

Where do we see the wounds? Melting permafrost, fracked earth, tailings ponds, tanker spills… Continue reading “Water is the blood that flows through this wounded body”

“I thirst…” Ecumenical Good Friday Walk

2016 TORONTO GOOD FRIDAY WALK TO FOCUS ON WATER

Jesus’ cry from the cross, “I am thirsty,” is the impetus for this year’s Ecumenical Good Friday Walk for Justice in downtown Toronto.

On the traditional territory of the Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation, we will walk in the Lake Ontario Waterfront watershed, starting on the shore of Lake Ontario at Harbour Square Park, just west of the ferry docks at the foot of Bay Street.  Participants will gather at 2 p.m., then proceed north on Bay Street, stopping at ‘stations’ along the way to decry the unjust use of the divine gift of water leading to environmental degradation and vast numbers of refugees.

The Walk will end at the Church of the Holy Trinity (just west of the Eaton Centre) for a brief worship service and message from Jennifer Henry, Executive Director of Kairos. “The health of water is about the health of our communities — not only the quality of our relations with the earth community within watersheds, but also the nature of relationships with Indigenous peoples as the original custodians of water,” Henry says.

A simple supper will take place there at approximately 4:00 p.m. A freewill offering will support the efforts of participating social justice organizations.

As Jesus cried out in thirst from the Cross, we too thirst for justice – for the environment and for all creatures adversely affected by systems that misuse or destroy Earth, our sacred home.

History of the walk and past walk pictures on their website.

‘Our work, as Christians in Canada today, is dissent’

I stumbled across a great article online. I think it puts the struggle to be faithful today in a helpful light:

Our job is to offer the wisdom of scripture: “Seek justice, love kindness, walk humbly with God.” …

Admittedly, it is a very wide mandate. So much justice-seeking to be done – justice for the land, suffering from runaway oil and gas exploitation and factory farms that are anything but kind. Justice in the face of agri-business that seeks a quick profit, not the long, slow, humble walking with the seasons and the soil that sustains it for our grandchildren. Justice for workers, suffering from anti-union legislation and secret trade deals that disempower them. Justice-seeking as new security legislation threatens to turn CSIS into a secret force, policing those whose legitimate protests – against a pipeline, say – might be construed as “interference with critical infrastructure.”

Read the whole article at EssentialSpirituality.com.